Small Animal Hospital

★★★★★
  • 6695 Magnolia Ave

    Riverside, CA 92506

    Map & Directions
  • 951-684-1530

About Small Animal Hospital

Hours
Mon-Fri 7am-6pm, Sat 8am-12pm

Unclassified

Unclassified
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My family has been going to Small Animal Hospital for over 50 years. We've never had any problems with the staff or doctors. I love Dr. Mickelson. He's the best Vet I've found. We've had dogs for many years and have always taken them to this place.

5
★★★★★

My family has been going to Small Animal Hospital for over 50 years. We've never had any problems with the staff or doctors. I love Dr. Mickelson. He's the best Vet I've found. We've had dogs for many years and have always taken them to this place.

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I REALLY LIKED THIS VET THEY WERE LOVE CARING AND FRIENDLY THEY Are VERY CLEAN and THEY TREAT YOU GREAT THE SERVICE IS FANTASTIC THANKS FOR all YOUR HELP WE APPRECIATE YOU GUYS

5
★★★★★

I REALLY LIKED THIS VET THEY WERE LOVE CARING AND FRIENDLY THEY Are VERY CLEAN and THEY TREAT YOU GREAT THE SERVICE IS FANTASTIC THANKS FOR all YOUR HELP WE APPRECIATE YOU GUYS

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

.

I have worked with animals and in veterinary hospitals for years. My response is to the complainer about not getting a price for a dog neuter OVER THE PHONE-NOT PROFESSIONAL! You are not asking for a price on a pizza! You wouldn't call your doctor and ask for an exact total for an appendix removal, brain surgery or to have your manhood taken away...they couldn't give it to you. Surgeries are not as simply priced as an exam. Exams are a straightforward charge-surgeries are not. During surgery your animal may have complications, need special requirements due to age, breed, weight, medical history, etc. These special requirements are discussed before the surgery during an exam and cannot be detected over the phone. Yes, you may know how much your dog weighs, but the doctor needs to know medical history, current medical status, sound of heart/lungs, tooth/mouth condition, temperature, etc. A doctor and/or their staff would never be able to give you an EXACT amount on a surgery-there are too many variables. $39 bucks is cheap for an examination on your pet. They should at the very least receive an exam yearly! Your pet deserves the best care and $39 is nothing-if it is too expensive, you don't need to be owning pets. You shouldn't get upset with a hospital that offers extra protection for your animal like pre-anesthetic bloodwork, pre-op/post-op pain medications, dangerous tumor removals, dental cleaning and IV catheters. Those options are not included in a surgery, if they were, clients would freak out all the time for high prices. Therefore they are optional to the owner and discussed at the ever-so-important pre-surgical examination for wow, $39. Bottom line if you can't understand what I just wrote: If you want to be a good owner and receive great medical care, sorry, it costs money. If you want to be cheap, (you shouldn't even own pets), then go to the humane society or shelter where they do a "quick snip" and your pet ends up with a number of health complications. Animals are not pieces of garbage that you leave in the backyard. While I applaud you are looking into getting your dog neutered, it will cost money, and your pet deserves the same care any other family member would receive.

4
★★★★☆

I have worked with animals and in veterinary hospitals for years. My response is to the complainer about not getting a price for a dog neuter OVER THE PHONE-NOT PROFESSIONAL! You are not asking for a price on a pizza! You wouldn't call your doctor and ask for an exact total for an appendix removal, brain surgery or to have your manhood taken away...they couldn't give it to you. Surgeries are not as simply priced as an exam. Exams are a straightforward charge-surgeries are not. During surgery your animal may have complications, need special requirements due to age, breed, weight, medical history, etc. These special requirements are discussed before the surgery during an exam and cannot be detected over the phone. Yes, you may know how much your dog weighs, but the doctor needs to know medical history, current medical status, sound of heart/lungs, tooth/mouth condition, temperature, etc. A doctor and/or their staff would never be able to give you an EXACT amount on a surgery-there are too many variables. $39 bucks is cheap for an examination on your pet. They should at the very least receive an exam yearly! Your pet deserves the best care and $39 is nothing-if it is too expensive, you don't need to be owning pets. You shouldn't get upset with a hospital that offers extra protection for your animal like pre-anesthetic bloodwork, pre-op/post-op pain medications, dangerous tumor removals, dental cleaning and IV catheters. Those options are not included in a surgery, if they were, clients would freak out all the time for high prices. Therefore they are optional to the owner and discussed at the ever-so-important pre-surgical examination for wow, $39. Bottom line if you can't understand what I just wrote: If you want to be a good owner and receive great medical care, sorry, it costs money. If you want to be cheap, (you shouldn't even own pets), then go to the humane society or shelter where they do a "quick snip" and your pet ends up with a number of health complications. Animals are not pieces of garbage that you leave in the backyard. While I applaud you are looking into getting your dog neutered, it will cost money, and your pet deserves the same care any other family member would receive.

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2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

.

The staff at the Small Animal Hospital we very accommodating and helpful when I brought my cat in for emergency care. I called them in the morning and they were able to fit me in right away. Dr. Fine treated both of us kindly and did everything she could to get my cat back to normal. I had to bring my cat in two consecutive days later because they did not feel comfortable leaving her overnight on fluids, but talked to us almost immediately when we came in even without an appointment. This did get a little straining on my time because I had to drop her off before work and then make it back to the hospital before they close at six. The care that they provided exceded my expectations. I feel that they did not overcharge me or give my cat any extra care that she did not need. I do not know if Dr. Fine specializes in cat care, but she is an excellent vet.
The care was a bit pricey. In all I spent $600 on care that included an initial examination, two check ups, blood panel tests, two x-rays, fluids, two days at the animal hospital and medication. While she is better, we do not know what initially made her sick. However, the Small Animal Hospital discovered a medical condition unrelated that can be treated to keep her healthy.
The patients at the Small Animal Hospital are also very friendly. I would recommend Dr. Fine and the Small Animal Hospital to anyone with a cat.

5
★★★★★

The staff at the Small Animal Hospital we very accommodating and helpful when I brought my cat in for emergency care. I called them in the morning and they were able to fit me in right away. Dr. Fine treated both of us kindly and did everything she could to get my cat back to normal. I had to bring my cat in two consecutive days later because they did not feel comfortable leaving her overnight on fluids, but talked to us almost immediately when we came in even without an appointment. This did get a little straining on my time because I had to drop her off before work and then make it back to the hospital before they close at six. The care that they provided exceded my expectations. I feel that they did not overcharge me or give my cat any extra care that she did not need. I do not know if Dr. Fine specializes in cat care, but she is an excellent vet.
The care was a bit pricey. In all I spent $600 on care that included an initial examination, two check ups, blood panel tests, two x-rays, fluids, two days at the animal hospital and medication. While she is better, we do not know what initially made her sick. However, the Small Animal Hospital discovered a medical condition unrelated that can be treated to keep her healthy.
The patients at the Small Animal Hospital are also very friendly. I would recommend Dr. Fine and the Small Animal Hospital to anyone with a cat.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

.

These vets are very knowledgeable. The doctors at the Small Animal Hospital got my dog back on his feet after he almost died from diabetic ketoacidosis. Dr. Mickelson was so nice that he actually let me e-mail my dog's blood glucose scores to him, free of charge. He never made me feel that he was in a hurry. He was very thorough, too. Dr. Davis is so devoted to his job that he kept on seeing his patients even after he was seriously bitten by a dog. (A client that day happened to be a doctor, who dressed his wound.)
There were a few negatives that I would like to mention. Even good vets make mistakes.
One negative is that Dr. Mickelson deterred me from going to a specialist when his knowledge of managing diabetes became insufficient. Therefore, he gave me advice that almost cost me a day of work and a trip to the animal ER. I had asked Dr. M about the possibility of mixing two kinds of insulin for my diabetic dog--short term and long term insulin. This is what humans do to manage their diabetes. I do my own blood glucose curves on my dog, and found that his diabetes was not as well controlled as it could be. At first, Dr. M told me it was a bad idea to use short term and long term insulins. Then, at another time, he admitted that he just didn't have any experience with mixing insulins. At that point, he should have referred me to Acute Critical Care in Tustin, or to another specialist. Instead, he gave me the only advice he could think of to bring down my dog's blood glucose without mixing insulins. He told me to give my dog his insulin ahead of his food. His idea was that this would enable insulin to take effect at the same time that my dog's blood glucose shot up from eating. The problem was, he never considered what I might do if my dog decided not to eat after I'd already given him his insulin. In that case, my dog would become hypoglycemic, and could even die. (Of course, I would not allow that to happen!) Not too many days later, my dog didn't want to eat after I'd followed Dr. Mickelson's advice and had given my dog his insulin first. To no avail, I tried adding many things to his food--cat tuna (which my dog loves), ketchup, etc. As time got nearer for me to leave for work, I began to get very upset and worried. I couldn't even call the vet's office, as they were not open yet. Finally, I tried feeding my dog some meat scraps from my fridge. Fortunately, he was willing to eat them. Also, it was fortunate that I even had those meat scraps, as I usually don't cook.
I called the Small Animal Hospital to ask if the meat I gave my dog would be enough to keep him from becoming hypoglycemic with the dose of insulin I'd given him. They were unhelpful and even apathetic. I was told that the vet would arrive in 2 hours--after I had to be at work. They could and should have suggested that I call the 24 hour number to Acute Critical Care in Tustin. In my anger and frustration at their apathetic response, I told them I would hold them liable if my dog died. I knew it was an idle threat, because I would not let my dog die. I just wanted them to feel some of my frustration instead of just blowing me off.
I was fortunate again in that my retired parents were available to drive from another city to my house to feed my dog more meat. That was the only way I could leave for work. During a scheduled break at work, I called and apologized for having been so angry with the staff. They were still unhelpful.
Even so, hours later, Dr. Mickelson left me a message saying that he didn't feel obligated to help me because of the tone I'd taken with his staff. In his message, the vet finally referred me to the specialist in Tustin. (One must have a referral to be seen.) Had he referred me in the first place, none of this would have happened.
Another thing is that he does not seem up-to-date on treatment for diabetic cats. According to a specialist at ACC & Internal Medicine in Tustin, diabetic cats need to be on twice daily insulin shots of either PZI or Lantus. NPH insulin is not good for cats. The front desk staff at the Small Animal Hospital were not even familiar with the 40 unit insulin syringes needed for PZI insulin. Dr. Mickelson didn't see a problem with my cat being on once daily injections of NPH.
In conclusion, I would still recommend this veterinary practice to anyone. I have found that no regular practice vet knows a whole lot about diabetes. It is best to see a specialist right from the beginning.
I would advise any new client to check over bills, because I was overcharged at least twice. On one occasion, I had to ask Dr. M to intervene, because the staff didn't believe me that they had charged me the wrong price. For a long time after, the front desk staff treated me like I was a jerk for complaining that they'd overcharged me. They also estimated it would cost over $500 for me to have my 79 pound dog??s teeth cleaned.

4
★★★★☆

These vets are very knowledgeable. The doctors at the Small Animal Hospital got my dog back on his feet after he almost died from diabetic ketoacidosis. Dr. Mickelson was so nice that he actually let me e-mail my dog's blood glucose scores to him, free of charge. He never made me feel that he was in a hurry. He was very thorough, too. Dr. Davis is so devoted to his job that he kept on seeing his patients even after he was seriously bitten by a dog. (A client that day happened to be a doctor, who dressed his wound.)
There were a few negatives that I would like to mention. Even good vets make mistakes.
One negative is that Dr. Mickelson deterred me from going to a specialist when his knowledge of managing diabetes became insufficient. Therefore, he gave me advice that almost cost me a day of work and a trip to the animal ER. I had asked Dr. M about the possibility of mixing two kinds of insulin for my diabetic dog--short term and long term insulin. This is what humans do to manage their diabetes. I do my own blood glucose curves on my dog, and found that his diabetes was not as well controlled as it could be. At first, Dr. M told me it was a bad idea to use short term and long term insulins. Then, at another time, he admitted that he just didn't have any experience with mixing insulins. At that point, he should have referred me to Acute Critical Care in Tustin, or to another specialist. Instead, he gave me the only advice he could think of to bring down my dog's blood glucose without mixing insulins. He told me to give my dog his insulin ahead of his food. His idea was that this would enable insulin to take effect at the same time that my dog's blood glucose shot up from eating. The problem was, he never considered what I might do if my dog decided not to eat after I'd already given him his insulin. In that case, my dog would become hypoglycemic, and could even die. (Of course, I would not allow that to happen!) Not too many days later, my dog didn't want to eat after I'd followed Dr. Mickelson's advice and had given my dog his insulin first. To no avail, I tried adding many things to his food--cat tuna (which my dog loves), ketchup, etc. As time got nearer for me to leave for work, I began to get very upset and worried. I couldn't even call the vet's office, as they were not open yet. Finally, I tried feeding my dog some meat scraps from my fridge. Fortunately, he was willing to eat them. Also, it was fortunate that I even had those meat scraps, as I usually don't cook.
I called the Small Animal Hospital to ask if the meat I gave my dog would be enough to keep him from becoming hypoglycemic with the dose of insulin I'd given him. They were unhelpful and even apathetic. I was told that the vet would arrive in 2 hours--after I had to be at work. They could and should have suggested that I call the 24 hour number to Acute Critical Care in Tustin. In my anger and frustration at their apathetic response, I told them I would hold them liable if my dog died. I knew it was an idle threat, because I would not let my dog die. I just wanted them to feel some of my frustration instead of just blowing me off.
I was fortunate again in that my retired parents were available to drive from another city to my house to feed my dog more meat. That was the only way I could leave for work. During a scheduled break at work, I called and apologized for having been so angry with the staff. They were still unhelpful.
Even so, hours later, Dr. Mickelson left me a message saying that he didn't feel obligated to help me because of the tone I'd taken with his staff. In his message, the vet finally referred me to the specialist in Tustin. (One must have a referral to be seen.) Had he referred me in the first place, none of this would have happened.
Another thing is that he does not seem up-to-date on treatment for diabetic cats. According to a specialist at ACC & Internal Medicine in Tustin, diabetic cats need to be on twice daily insulin shots of either PZI or Lantus. NPH insulin is not good for cats. The front desk staff at the Small Animal Hospital were not even familiar with the 40 unit insulin syringes needed for PZI insulin. Dr. Mickelson didn't see a problem with my cat being on once daily injections of NPH.
In conclusion, I would still recommend this veterinary practice to anyone. I have found that no regular practice vet knows a whole lot about diabetes. It is best to see a specialist right from the beginning.
I would advise any new client to check over bills, because I was overcharged at least twice. On one occasion, I had to ask Dr. M to intervene, because the staff didn't believe me that they had charged me the wrong price. For a long time after, the front desk staff treated me like I was a jerk for complaining that they'd overcharged me. They also estimated it would cost over $500 for me to have my 79 pound dog??s teeth cleaned.

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