The Dikeou Collection

★★★★★
A private art collection founded by Devon Dikeou and Pany Dikeou
39.7453 -104.992
Map and Directions to The Dikeou Collection

303-623-3001

1615 California St Ste 515

Denver, CO

80202

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About The Dikeou Collection

Hours
Wed-Fri 11am-5pm

Arts & Entertainment

Arts & Entertainment
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5.0 9
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Reviews 1 - 9 of 9.

Latest reviews from Citysearch.

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Came across the DK Collection through a friend in August 2011 was amazed to by the artwork in the galleries, and the retro feel & look of the space. Think Madison Avenue decor with a PSG1 vibe. I have been to a few more events since then and was quite surprised to see how versatile the space is. As someone working in the arts and who always knew of Devon's name from the NYC art scene, I am quite glad to see that her collection is here in Denver. The Pop-up Space on Bannock is a beautiful building as well. Love the records and player that are available to use in the back area. I highly recommend popping into the collection for an event or a quiet respite from the madness down on the 16th Street Mall.

5
★★★★★

Came across the DK Collection through a friend in August 2011 was amazed to by the artwork in the galleries, and the retro feel & look of the space. Think Madison Avenue decor with a PSG1 vibe. I have been to a few more events since then and was quite surprised to see how versatile the space is. As someone working in the arts and who always knew of Devon's name from the NYC art scene, I am quite glad to see that her collection is here in Denver. The Pop-up Space on Bannock is a beautiful building as well. Love the records and player that are available to use in the back area. I highly recommend popping into the collection for an event or a quiet respite from the madness down on the 16th Street Mall.

.

The most fun art experience I've had in Denver.
The entire collection is quirky and unique. My favorite piece is a gorgeous installation of glass bottles by Paul Ramirez Jonas. They're all filled with different amounts of water and you hit them with a mallet as you move around the room. This makes different notes which play out an old battle tune. My nephews loved this one!
Reached my zen at Sarah's art-themed yoga class at the pop-up space on Bannock. I'll definitely be back

5
★★★★★

The most fun art experience I've had in Denver.
The entire collection is quirky and unique. My favorite piece is a gorgeous installation of glass bottles by Paul Ramirez Jonas. They're all filled with different amounts of water and you hit them with a mallet as you move around the room. This makes different notes which play out an old battle tune. My nephews loved this one!
Reached my zen at Sarah's art-themed yoga class at the pop-up space on Bannock. I'll definitely be back

.

I first discovered the Dikeou Collection when I was an undergraduate in Denver studying English. This is one of my all-time favorite arts venues. A number of the pieces are interactive (and 3 are musical) and the installations are memorable. Additionally, the building where the Dikeou Collection is located was built in the 1800's and many of the original features have been preserved. Don't miss the old-fashioned mail shoots by the stairs!

5
★★★★★

I first discovered the Dikeou Collection when I was an undergraduate in Denver studying English. This is one of my all-time favorite arts venues. A number of the pieces are interactive (and 3 are musical) and the installations are memorable. Additionally, the building where the Dikeou Collection is located was built in the 1800's and many of the original features have been preserved. Don't miss the old-fashioned mail shoots by the stairs!

.

Sweet hidden gem of the Denver art world. It's in a funky old office building which feels like it could have Marlowe's P.I. office in it instead it has a wide array of contemporary art. And it's free! Check it out.

5
★★★★★

Sweet hidden gem of the Denver art world. It's in a funky old office building which feels like it could have Marlowe's P.I. office in it instead it has a wide array of contemporary art. And it's free! Check it out.

.

On a recent visit to Denver, I found myself, yet again, in total awe of the Dikeou Collection. Since my last trip out West, the collection has grown and though I'm still completely wowed by Momoyo Torimitsu's larger-than-life-sized blow-up bunnies, a new installation by the New York-based artist Johannes VanDerBeek just blew me away. VanDerBeek created the work in 2008 and titled it 'Newspaper Ruined' (I understand from Jessica Hughes who runs the Dikeou and gives an excellent docent tour), that it was installed by the artist about a year ago. Through careful planning, cutting, pasting and collage techniques, VanDerBeek created a 3-D environment, a village if you will, that is reminiscent of a hallucinogenic frontier town where Indian tepees co-exist with structures that have a quintessentially American West vernacular: billboard signs, oil rigs, prairie houses. The work was recycled from a single newspaper and some passages where text and image are seamlessly combined give the work an overall feeling of being incongruous while at the same time meant to be. The entire piece is erected on a tabled platform not unlike an elaborate Victorian diorama.

5
★★★★★

On a recent visit to Denver, I found myself, yet again, in total awe of the Dikeou Collection. Since my last trip out West, the collection has grown and though I'm still completely wowed by Momoyo Torimitsu's larger-than-life-sized blow-up bunnies, a new installation by the New York-based artist Johannes VanDerBeek just blew me away. VanDerBeek created the work in 2008 and titled it 'Newspaper Ruined' (I understand from Jessica Hughes who runs the Dikeou and gives an excellent docent tour), that it was installed by the artist about a year ago. Through careful planning, cutting, pasting and collage techniques, VanDerBeek created a 3-D environment, a village if you will, that is reminiscent of a hallucinogenic frontier town where Indian tepees co-exist with structures that have a quintessentially American West vernacular: billboard signs, oil rigs, prairie houses. The work was recycled from a single newspaper and some passages where text and image are seamlessly combined give the work an overall feeling of being incongruous while at the same time meant to be. The entire piece is erected on a tabled platform not unlike an elaborate Victorian diorama.

Pros: new installation, great atmosphere, worth returning to

.

Ive attended a few of literary events at the Dikeou Collection over the last year or so and its always been a first-rate experience. In fact, I would argue that the Dikeou Collection beats out most literary venues in Denver, including any caf/bar or even bookstore. The collection offers a unique background for readings: room after room of contemporary art; two ceiling-height pink inflatable bunnies, a Last Supper rendition made of chocolate syrup, the imagined interior of an apocalyptic whale. All of the artwork contributes to a high-minded, yet hip atmosphere in which the events are held. It also offers a great entry point into the world of contemporary art for the unfamiliar.

The readings themselves are top-notch. Featuring an abundance of local talent from the greater Denver area, including professors and grad students from the University of Denver, UCD, Boulder, and Naropa. Standouts include Bin Ramke, Laird Hunt, Eleni Sikelianos, Noah Eli Gordon, Saleh Saterstrom, Mathias Svalina, and more. The current and previous Directors of the collection are writers and DU grads themselves, which helps explain the quality of the readings and literary prowess of the programming.

Nowhere else in Denver combines contemporary art with the local literary scene to the degree of success of the Dikeou Collection. Conveniently located right off 16th Street Mall to boot.

5
★★★★★

Ive attended a few of literary events at the Dikeou Collection over the last year or so and its always been a first-rate experience. In fact, I would argue that the Dikeou Collection beats out most literary venues in Denver, including any caf/bar or even bookstore. The collection offers a unique background for readings: room after room of contemporary art; two ceiling-height pink inflatable bunnies, a Last Supper rendition made of chocolate syrup, the imagined interior of an apocalyptic whale. All of the artwork contributes to a high-minded, yet hip atmosphere in which the events are held. It also offers a great entry point into the world of contemporary art for the unfamiliar.

The readings themselves are top-notch. Featuring an abundance of local talent from the greater Denver area, including professors and grad students from the University of Denver, UCD, Boulder, and Naropa. Standouts include Bin Ramke, Laird Hunt, Eleni Sikelianos, Noah Eli Gordon, Saleh Saterstrom, Mathias Svalina, and more. The current and previous Directors of the collection are writers and DU grads themselves, which helps explain the quality of the readings and literary prowess of the programming.

Nowhere else in Denver combines contemporary art with the local literary scene to the degree of success of the Dikeou Collection. Conveniently located right off 16th Street Mall to boot.

.

On a recent visit to Denver, I found myself, yet again, in total awe of the Dikeou Collection. Since my last trip out West, the collection has grown and though I'm still completely wowed by Momoyo Torimitsu's larger-than-life-sized blow-up bunnies, a new installation by the New York-based artist Johannes VanDerBeek just blew me away. VanDerBeek created the work in 2008 and titled it 'Newspaper Ruined' (I understand from Jessica Hughes who runs the Dikeou it was installed by the artist about a year ago). Through careful planning, cutting, pasting and collage techniques, VanDerBeek created a 3-D environment, a village if you will, that is reminiscent of a hallucinogenic frontier town where Indian tepees co-exist with structures that have a quintessentially American West vernacular: billboard signs, oil rigs, prairie houses. The work was recycled from a single newspaper and some passages where text and image are seamlessly combined give the work an overall feeling though completely incongruous were somehow all meant to be. The entire piece is erected on a tabled platform not unlike an elaborate Victorian diorama.

5
★★★★★

On a recent visit to Denver, I found myself, yet again, in total awe of the Dikeou Collection. Since my last trip out West, the collection has grown and though I'm still completely wowed by Momoyo Torimitsu's larger-than-life-sized blow-up bunnies, a new installation by the New York-based artist Johannes VanDerBeek just blew me away. VanDerBeek created the work in 2008 and titled it 'Newspaper Ruined' (I understand from Jessica Hughes who runs the Dikeou it was installed by the artist about a year ago). Through careful planning, cutting, pasting and collage techniques, VanDerBeek created a 3-D environment, a village if you will, that is reminiscent of a hallucinogenic frontier town where Indian tepees co-exist with structures that have a quintessentially American West vernacular: billboard signs, oil rigs, prairie houses. The work was recycled from a single newspaper and some passages where text and image are seamlessly combined give the work an overall feeling though completely incongruous were somehow all meant to be. The entire piece is erected on a tabled platform not unlike an elaborate Victorian diorama.

Pros: Unique Contemporary Art Collection

.

I visited the Dikeou Collection and was happily surprised. Not only is it a first rate contemporary art collection of International artists open to the public for free in Downtown Denver, but it is also a collection that gives roomliterally rooms for the artists collected to breathe. Both these feats are rare accomplishments for private collections.

In the Dikeou Collection, each artist is situated or paired in a series of old office suites. As invigorating as this is, what is more inspiring is the individual artists complete representation. Almost without exception the artists work is something extraordinary: extraordinary in the works realizationtheres lots of installation. Extraordinary in the works expressioncomprehensive groupings of a single artists oeuvre in singular and multiple mediumssound, video, photography, and drawing. Extraordinary in the fluency of representationeach artists vision is adhered to articulately. Plus the collection seems to be affiliated with zingmagazineeach artist has participated in an issueand zingmagazine is considered to be the bible for contemporary collectors in the know. Ultimately, the Dikeou collection reveals a commitment to collecting, to Denver, and most importantly the artists collected. A must see in Denver.

5
★★★★★

I visited the Dikeou Collection and was happily surprised. Not only is it a first rate contemporary art collection of International artists open to the public for free in Downtown Denver, but it is also a collection that gives roomliterally rooms for the artists collected to breathe. Both these feats are rare accomplishments for private collections.

In the Dikeou Collection, each artist is situated or paired in a series of old office suites. As invigorating as this is, what is more inspiring is the individual artists complete representation. Almost without exception the artists work is something extraordinary: extraordinary in the works realizationtheres lots of installation. Extraordinary in the works expressioncomprehensive groupings of a single artists oeuvre in singular and multiple mediumssound, video, photography, and drawing. Extraordinary in the fluency of representationeach artists vision is adhered to articulately. Plus the collection seems to be affiliated with zingmagazineeach artist has participated in an issueand zingmagazine is considered to be the bible for contemporary collectors in the know. Ultimately, the Dikeou collection reveals a commitment to collecting, to Denver, and most importantly the artists collected. A must see in Denver.

Pros: great variety of work, interesting space

.

Having been to a fair amount of shows at the Dikeou Collection, I find myself impressed with the variety of events hosted (as well as the works on display) in this nice, interesting space. In the past I've been especially fond of the more avant-garde music events, which often feature audience interaction--and with the layout of the space it's hard not to get involved. It's cool, though, because for me there's nothing quite like making music with a small group of colleagues while sitting in the shadow of two giant pink bunnies. Great for networking, great to walk around...I'll be checking the events listing here for some time.

5
★★★★★

Having been to a fair amount of shows at the Dikeou Collection, I find myself impressed with the variety of events hosted (as well as the works on display) in this nice, interesting space. In the past I've been especially fond of the more avant-garde music events, which often feature audience interaction--and with the layout of the space it's hard not to get involved. It's cool, though, because for me there's nothing quite like making music with a small group of colleagues while sitting in the shadow of two giant pink bunnies. Great for networking, great to walk around...I'll be checking the events listing here for some time.

Pros: frequent, interesting events

Editorial from

Private contemporary art collection in downtown Denver features artists from around the world.

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