Wellness Medical Center

★★★★★

About Wellness Medical Center

Hours
Mon 08:00 AM-06:30 PM;Tue 08:00 AM-06:30 PM;Wed 08:00 AM-06:30 PM;Thu 08:00 AM-06:30 PM;Fri 08:00 AM-06:30 PM
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Stop Bullying on the Spot:STOPBULLYING.GOV\r
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When adults respond quickly and consistently to bullying behavior they send the message that it is not acceptable. Research shows this can stop bullying behavior over time. There are simple

3
★★★★★

Stop Bullying on the Spot:STOPBULLYING.GOV\r
\r
When adults respond quickly and consistently to bullying behavior they send the message that it is not acceptable. Research shows this can stop bullying behavior over time. There are simple

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Report Cyberbullying to Online Service Providers\r
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Cyberbullying often violates the terms of service established by social media sites and internet service providers.\r
\r
Review their terms and conditions or rights and responsibilities

3
★★★★★

Report Cyberbullying to Online Service Providers\r
\r
Cyberbullying often violates the terms of service established by social media sites and internet service providers.\r
\r
Review their terms and conditions or rights and responsibilities

.

Definition

The term ""cyberbullying"" was first coined and defined by Canadian educator and anti-bullying activist Bill Belsey, as ""the use of information and communication technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behavior by an individual or group, that is intended to harm others.""[1]

Cyberbullying has subsequently been defined as ""when the Internet, cell phones or other devices are used to send or post text or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person"".[2] Other researchers use similar language to describe the phenomenon.[3][4]

Cyberbullying can be as simple as continuing to send e-mail to someone who has said they want no further contact with the sender, but it may also include threats, sexual remarks, pejorative labels (i.e., hate speech), ganging up on victims by making them the subject of ridicule in forums, and posting false statements as fact aimed at humiliation.

Cyberbullies may disclose victims' personal data (e.g. real name, address, or workplace/schools) at websites or forums or may pose as the identity of a victim for the purpose of publishing material in their name that defames or ridicules them. Some cyber-bullies may also send threatening and harassing emails and instant messages to the victims, while other post rumors or gossip and instigate others to dislike and gang up on the target.

Kids report being mean to each other online beginning as young as 2nd grade. According to research, boys initiate mean online activity earlier than girls do. However, by middle school, girls are more likely to engage in cyberbullying than boys do.[5] Whether the bully is male or female, their purpose is to intentionally embarrass others, harass, intimidate, or make threats online to one another. This bullying occurs via email, text messaging, posts to blogs, and Web sites.

Though the use of sexual remarks and threats are sometimes present in cyberbullying, it is not the same as sexual harassment and does not necessarily involve sexual predators.
Cyberbullying vs. cyberstalking

The practice of cyberbullying is not limited to children and, while the behavior is identified by the same definition in adults, the distinction in age gro

2
★★★★★

Definition

The term ""cyberbullying"" was first coined and defined by Canadian educator and anti-bullying activist Bill Belsey, as ""the use of information and communication technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behavior by an individual or group, that is intended to harm others.""[1]

Cyberbullying has subsequently been defined as ""when the Internet, cell phones or other devices are used to send or post text or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person"".[2] Other researchers use similar language to describe the phenomenon.[3][4]

Cyberbullying can be as simple as continuing to send e-mail to someone who has said they want no further contact with the sender, but it may also include threats, sexual remarks, pejorative labels (i.e., hate speech), ganging up on victims by making them the subject of ridicule in forums, and posting false statements as fact aimed at humiliation.

Cyberbullies may disclose victims' personal data (e.g. real name, address, or workplace/schools) at websites or forums or may pose as the identity of a victim for the purpose of publishing material in their name that defames or ridicules them. Some cyber-bullies may also send threatening and harassing emails and instant messages to the victims, while other post rumors or gossip and instigate others to dislike and gang up on the target.

Kids report being mean to each other online beginning as young as 2nd grade. According to research, boys initiate mean online activity earlier than girls do. However, by middle school, girls are more likely to engage in cyberbullying than boys do.[5] Whether the bully is male or female, their purpose is to intentionally embarrass others, harass, intimidate, or make threats online to one another. This bullying occurs via email, text messaging, posts to blogs, and Web sites.

Though the use of sexual remarks and threats are sometimes present in cyberbullying, it is not the same as sexual harassment and does not necessarily involve sexual predators.
Cyberbullying vs. cyberstalking

The practice of cyberbullying is not limited to children and, while the behavior is identified by the same definition in adults, the distinction in age gro

.

Legislation against cyberbullying

Main article: Cyberstalking legislation

United States

Legislation geared at penalizing cyberbullying has been introduced in a number of U.S. states including New York, Missouri, Rhode Island and Maryland. At least seven states passed laws against digital harassment in 2007. Dardenne Prairie of Springfield, Missouri, passed a city ordinance making online harassment a misdemeanor. The city of St. Charles, Missouri has passed a similar ordinance. Missouri is among other states where lawmakers are pursuing state legislation, with a task forces expected to have ??cyberbullying?? laws drafted and implemented.[23] In June, 2008, Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-Calif.) and Rep. Kenny Hulshof (R-Mo.) proposed a federal law that would criminalize acts of cyberbullying.[24]

Lawmakers are seeking to address cyberbullying with new legislation because there's currently no specific law on the books that deals with it. A fairly new federal cyberstalking law might address such acts, according to Parry Aftab, but no one has been prosecuted under it yet. The proposed federal law would make it illegal to use electronic means to ""coerce, intimidate, harass or cause other substantial emotional distress.""

In August 2008, the California state legislature passed one of the first laws in the country to deal directly with cyberbullying. The legislation, Assembly Bill 86 2008, gives school administrators the authority to discipline students for bullying others offline or online.[25] This law took effect, January 1, 2009.[26]

A recent ruling first seen in the UK determined that it is possible for an Internet Service Provider (ISP) to be liable for the content of sites which it hosts, setting a precedent that any ISP should treat a notice of complaint seriously and investigate it immediately.[27]

18 U.S.C. 875(c) criminalizes the making of threats via Internet.

2
★★★★★

Legislation against cyberbullying

Main article: Cyberstalking legislation

United States

Legislation geared at penalizing cyberbullying has been introduced in a number of U.S. states including New York, Missouri, Rhode Island and Maryland. At least seven states passed laws against digital harassment in 2007. Dardenne Prairie of Springfield, Missouri, passed a city ordinance making online harassment a misdemeanor. The city of St. Charles, Missouri has passed a similar ordinance. Missouri is among other states where lawmakers are pursuing state legislation, with a task forces expected to have ??cyberbullying?? laws drafted and implemented.[23] In June, 2008, Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-Calif.) and Rep. Kenny Hulshof (R-Mo.) proposed a federal law that would criminalize acts of cyberbullying.[24]

Lawmakers are seeking to address cyberbullying with new legislation because there's currently no specific law on the books that deals with it. A fairly new federal cyberstalking law might address such acts, according to Parry Aftab, but no one has been prosecuted under it yet. The proposed federal law would make it illegal to use electronic means to ""coerce, intimidate, harass or cause other substantial emotional distress.""

In August 2008, the California state legislature passed one of the first laws in the country to deal directly with cyberbullying. The legislation, Assembly Bill 86 2008, gives school administrators the authority to discipline students for bullying others offline or online.[25] This law took effect, January 1, 2009.[26]

A recent ruling first seen in the UK determined that it is possible for an Internet Service Provider (ISP) to be liable for the content of sites which it hosts, setting a precedent that any ISP should treat a notice of complaint seriously and investigate it immediately.[27]

18 U.S.C. 875(c) criminalizes the making of threats via Internet.

 

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