Kitchen of India

★★★★★
  • 1842 E Joppa Rd

    Parkville, MD 21234

    Map & Directions
  • 410-663-6880

About Kitchen of India

Hours
Monday 11:00 AM - 2:30 PM Tuesday 11:00 AM - 2:30 PM Wednesday 11:00 AM - 2:30 PM Thursday 11:00 AM - 2:30 PM Friday 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM Saturday 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM Sunday 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Reservations
Make A Reservation

Food

Food
More choices in Parkville:
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Indigma Indian Restaurant

802 North Charles St. Baltimore, MD

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920 N Charles St Baltimore, MD

4.875 8
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.

I have tried Kitchen of India's lunch buffet while a co-worker took me there for lunch.\r
The ambience was relaxing with soft music and the food was amazing. There were some extra ordinary vegetables that i have tried for the first time

3
★★★★★

I have tried Kitchen of India's lunch buffet while a co-worker took me there for lunch.\r
The ambience was relaxing with soft music and the food was amazing. There were some extra ordinary vegetables that i have tried for the first time

.

I visit Kitchen of India in regular basis. Their food and service is always tasty and pleasant. I never found any inconsistency in service and food.They work really hard to keep it up.

3
★★★★★

I visit Kitchen of India in regular basis. Their food and service is always tasty and pleasant. I never found any inconsistency in service and food.They work really hard to keep it up.

.

I have heard a lot about kitchen of India but did not care to try it. However i just came back from work and did not wanted to cook so gave it a try. Its unique in food and decoration should have been tried it before. Good that they are

3
★★★★★

I have heard a lot about kitchen of India but did not care to try it. However i just came back from work and did not wanted to cook so gave it a try. Its unique in food and decoration should have been tried it before. Good that they are

.

There are several places to enjoy in Baltimore, MD. Whether you are here for vacation or are staying in Baltimore if you are craving for some good authentic Indian (Spicy) food at reasonable price then you do not have to look any further.

Located in Northern Baltimore County, Kitchen of India, is one of the best places to enjoy some good spicy or non spicy food. If you like Indian food then
Kitchen of India
Neigborhood: Parkville
Baltimore, MD 21234
United States of America your search is over. The prices are very reasonable and food is excellent in taste.

There is a lunch buffet available which provides variety of dishes vegetarian as well as non vegetarian. The price for buffet is $6.95 for weekdays and $9.95 for weekends. There are enough food for vegetarians also. The taste of food is extremely good and you may even lick your fingers!!!

In the evening it becomes a cozy dining restaurant and you have to order whatever you want. Buffet is only for lunch and not for dinner. The food is available in different levels of spiciness. Low, Medium, Medium hot, Hot and Indian Hot are different levels of spiciness. Low and medium spiciness are pretty much good for any normal person. If you want medium spicy I would recommend you go with Medium Hot to Hot. If you love really spicy food than Indian Hot is the alternative. The restaurant prepares food with great care and one can know that by tasting there food... Excellent quality of food with reasonable price is an attractive offer.

Punjabi style cuisine is its main style and serves different appetizer and desserts. Menu also shows vegetarian dishes on one side so that there is no confusion about them. I am vegetarian and have tasted 4-5 vegetables and they are all very good. The servers are polite and treat you well. Food also arrives in good time and there are no delays under normal circumstances. I have gone there 5 times and I have received food always on time. One of there main difference is when you purchase any vegetable you can get either rice or bread free with it. Most of the Indian restaurant give you rice but never offer you bread free with vegetable.

2
★★★★★

There are several places to enjoy in Baltimore, MD. Whether you are here for vacation or are staying in Baltimore if you are craving for some good authentic Indian (Spicy) food at reasonable price then you do not have to look any further.

Located in Northern Baltimore County, Kitchen of India, is one of the best places to enjoy some good spicy or non spicy food. If you like Indian food then
Kitchen of India
Neigborhood: Parkville
Baltimore, MD 21234
United States of America your search is over. The prices are very reasonable and food is excellent in taste.

There is a lunch buffet available which provides variety of dishes vegetarian as well as non vegetarian. The price for buffet is $6.95 for weekdays and $9.95 for weekends. There are enough food for vegetarians also. The taste of food is extremely good and you may even lick your fingers!!!

In the evening it becomes a cozy dining restaurant and you have to order whatever you want. Buffet is only for lunch and not for dinner. The food is available in different levels of spiciness. Low, Medium, Medium hot, Hot and Indian Hot are different levels of spiciness. Low and medium spiciness are pretty much good for any normal person. If you want medium spicy I would recommend you go with Medium Hot to Hot. If you love really spicy food than Indian Hot is the alternative. The restaurant prepares food with great care and one can know that by tasting there food... Excellent quality of food with reasonable price is an attractive offer.

Punjabi style cuisine is its main style and serves different appetizer and desserts. Menu also shows vegetarian dishes on one side so that there is no confusion about them. I am vegetarian and have tasted 4-5 vegetables and they are all very good. The servers are polite and treat you well. Food also arrives in good time and there are no delays under normal circumstances. I have gone there 5 times and I have received food always on time. One of there main difference is when you purchase any vegetable you can get either rice or bread free with it. Most of the Indian restaurant give you rice but never offer you bread free with vegetable.

.

Mohammad Rahman and Salma Khanam, owners, Kitchen of India

By Rosemary Knower

You might think an unprepossessing building strip mall on Joppa Road couldn??t house a superb restauruant. Wrong. Just as wrong as all those skeptics who thought Little Washington in Virginia and Arthur Bryant??s in Chicago couldn??t serve first class regional food. Salma Khanan, the restaurant??s hostess Maitress d??, and Mohammed Rahman, the Executive Chef, are both from Bangladesh and were married there in what they smilingly acknowledge was an arranged marriage with love. They came to the United States early 1997, determined to start a restaurant. Rahman apprenticed his skills at a number of restaurants in Washington D.C. and Virginia, while Khanam worked as a software engineer. They chose this place at 1842 East Joppa Road ??Because it??s easy to get to and has lots of free parking,? says Rahman, ??and a big sign you can see from the Beltway.

Once inside, all the surroundings are a world away from carpet stores and Pep Boys. Indian paintings and carvings, each with a story, surround the diners in the bright, sunny, dining room where each table has fresh flowers. The spotless steel-domed buffet servers are are attended contantly by an attentive staff, and the mingled odors of fresch spices from the daily specials and menu favorites take you a world away. Kitchen of India is a frequent site for weddings and celebrations, and their catering business is in constant demand for parties like the New Years Eve Celebration for 200 members of Indian Community of Greater Baltimore. Since this organization has members from all over India, north and south,, they know good regional cooking when they find it.

For one thing, the food is all extremely fresh; the meat is Halal, and the seasonings are diverse and natural. For another, there??s a Tandouri oven in the beautifully arranged kitchen, which is where all those delicious breads and lamb and chicken and goat dishes come from, backed fresh through the day. There??s a daily lunch buffet of twelve items, that the group that calls themselves the Monday Lunch Club was taking full advantage of when I was there. It was also fully in the spirit of the delicately lettered sign that says, ??please help yourself to all you want, but don??t waste.?

As for the Metromix??s designation of the Kitchen of India as one of the most romantic restarants in Baltimore. They??re right. The glorious wall paintings and carvings illustrate traditional ways of planting and preparing food, so the diners are surrounded by a visual textbook on Indian and IndoChinese cooking. They are treated to the gentle scenes out of India??s storied romantic past, of Rama and Sita, Mumtaz Mahal and Shah Jahan I, of the flower-strewn gardens of Omar Khayyam and lovers exchanging cups and quotes.

. ??I especially love the vegetarian variety of food??and no additives; all natural.? Brent Driver, who is the family patriarch and family host today, confided, ?? If you??re not a vegetarian, there are fourteen chicken dishes from Balti to Xacuti, nine lamb dishes, fish, goat, and shrimp curries, numerous tandoori specials and fresh desserts. And the naan, which is baked fresh for you when you complete your order, and brought out on a hot platter a few minutes later.

??Cooking is my passion,? Rahman says; having in the course of a few dextrous minutes spoken with me while baking tandouri, sauting a vegetable dish, and laying out the fresh spices for both from a rainbow of cups put ready to hand with an attention and precision that will bring oohs and ahhhs in the dining room. ??I love this.?

Kitchen of India, 1842 East Joppa Road, 410 663-6880

2
★★★★★

Mohammad Rahman and Salma Khanam, owners, Kitchen of India

By Rosemary Knower

You might think an unprepossessing building strip mall on Joppa Road couldn??t house a superb restauruant. Wrong. Just as wrong as all those skeptics who thought Little Washington in Virginia and Arthur Bryant??s in Chicago couldn??t serve first class regional food. Salma Khanan, the restaurant??s hostess Maitress d??, and Mohammed Rahman, the Executive Chef, are both from Bangladesh and were married there in what they smilingly acknowledge was an arranged marriage with love. They came to the United States early 1997, determined to start a restaurant. Rahman apprenticed his skills at a number of restaurants in Washington D.C. and Virginia, while Khanam worked as a software engineer. They chose this place at 1842 East Joppa Road ??Because it??s easy to get to and has lots of free parking,? says Rahman, ??and a big sign you can see from the Beltway.

Once inside, all the surroundings are a world away from carpet stores and Pep Boys. Indian paintings and carvings, each with a story, surround the diners in the bright, sunny, dining room where each table has fresh flowers. The spotless steel-domed buffet servers are are attended contantly by an attentive staff, and the mingled odors of fresch spices from the daily specials and menu favorites take you a world away. Kitchen of India is a frequent site for weddings and celebrations, and their catering business is in constant demand for parties like the New Years Eve Celebration for 200 members of Indian Community of Greater Baltimore. Since this organization has members from all over India, north and south,, they know good regional cooking when they find it.

For one thing, the food is all extremely fresh; the meat is Halal, and the seasonings are diverse and natural. For another, there??s a Tandouri oven in the beautifully arranged kitchen, which is where all those delicious breads and lamb and chicken and goat dishes come from, backed fresh through the day. There??s a daily lunch buffet of twelve items, that the group that calls themselves the Monday Lunch Club was taking full advantage of when I was there. It was also fully in the spirit of the delicately lettered sign that says, ??please help yourself to all you want, but don??t waste.?

As for the Metromix??s designation of the Kitchen of India as one of the most romantic restarants in Baltimore. They??re right. The glorious wall paintings and carvings illustrate traditional ways of planting and preparing food, so the diners are surrounded by a visual textbook on Indian and IndoChinese cooking. They are treated to the gentle scenes out of India??s storied romantic past, of Rama and Sita, Mumtaz Mahal and Shah Jahan I, of the flower-strewn gardens of Omar Khayyam and lovers exchanging cups and quotes.

. ??I especially love the vegetarian variety of food??and no additives; all natural.? Brent Driver, who is the family patriarch and family host today, confided, ?? If you??re not a vegetarian, there are fourteen chicken dishes from Balti to Xacuti, nine lamb dishes, fish, goat, and shrimp curries, numerous tandoori specials and fresh desserts. And the naan, which is baked fresh for you when you complete your order, and brought out on a hot platter a few minutes later.

??Cooking is my passion,? Rahman says; having in the course of a few dextrous minutes spoken with me while baking tandouri, sauting a vegetable dish, and laying out the fresh spices for both from a rainbow of cups put ready to hand with an attention and precision that will bring oohs and ahhhs in the dining room. ??I love this.?

Kitchen of India, 1842 East Joppa Road, 410 663-6880

.

At Kitchen of India, pleasant surprises among good, mostly familiar dishes
By Richard Gorelick

Special to The Baltimore Sun

July 16, 2009

Tucked inside Kitchen of India's leatherette menu is a page of five appetizers and six entrees titled "New Additions." I wouldn't be surprised if this page with the same items, give or take an appetizer, has been inserted like this since Kitchen of India opened two years ago. (The Indian-Nepalese restaurant Mount Everest used to have this location before it relocated to Nottingham.) If so, then that's pretty smart marketing. We tried, and liked, a few things off of the New Additions page, but I don't think we would have if they had been listed under "Chef Specialties."

One of the things we tried, pani poori, I don't remember seeing in another area Indian restaurant. Street snacks in India, they'd make great appetizers to pass around at a party. Served seven to a plate, each hollowed out flour-and-wheat shell is stuffed with spiced mashed potatoes. They get dipped into a masala-spiced water and then popped whole into the mouth. Finding something new on an Indian restaurant menu isn't easy, and it was a good feeling to be surprised.

We also liked another New Addition appetizer, keema naan, which is the traditional bread but stuffed with spiced ground lamb. Savory bits of lamb are distributed throughout the bread, so each bite is delicious. This is a savory treat that does show up with some frequency, but somehow I never think to order it. Another new appetizer, shrimp pakora, was not as refreshing or stimulating as the other two. It was very familiar stuff.

A lot of Kitchen of India is familiar, mostly in a good way. As nice as it was to try new things, the reality is that most of us go looking for our favorites in a place like Kitchen of India, things like chana masala, chicken Jalfrezi and lamb korma.

Even so, we found for our entrees a few dishes that struck us as relative novelties. One of these, a luxurious dish called chicken Xacuti, was described on the menu as being "cooked South Indian style with coconut and mustard seed." Another was a fiery goat Balti, for which the meat gets sauteed with garlic, ginger and tomatoes in a woklike vessel called a karahi. The inclusion of a few goat dishes was another menu surprise, and the Balti preparation is available for both lamb and chicken as well. All of our entrees, which also included a lamb vindaloo, arrived at the table in particularly handsome and coppery tabletop food warmers, a nice touch.

We were pretty full by the time we got to these entrees, and for summer eating, they're heavy going. (The three of us had also tried an appetizer of potato-stuffed samosas, which had a clean-fried taste to them.) They may have sounded different on the menu, but they tasted more or less like other similar preparations in similar restaurants.

For whatever reason, our enthusiasm flagged, just a bit - no permanent converts to Balti or Xacuti. For the record, we also ordered a mixed tandoori grill, which included shrimp, chicken and lamb; it was a gluttonous but rewarding addition.

Kitchen of India has a nice looking room, but it's overly formal for my taste, the kind of room that only really comes alive when it's full (but seldom is). And there's some awkwardness when folks come in for carryout and kind of have to hover in the dining area while they wait for their food. Some wine or beer would have helped, and Kitchen of India is BYOB. Our waiter was sweet and gracious but was working alone when we visited. There were a few moments of wondering where he could have gone.

The young chef-owner here is Mohammad Rahman, who is better known as "Babu." I think Kitchen of India is worth a trip to Parkville. I have a feeling we barely scratched the menu's surface. Nice place.

2
★★★★★

At Kitchen of India, pleasant surprises among good, mostly familiar dishes
By Richard Gorelick

Special to The Baltimore Sun

July 16, 2009

Tucked inside Kitchen of India's leatherette menu is a page of five appetizers and six entrees titled "New Additions." I wouldn't be surprised if this page with the same items, give or take an appetizer, has been inserted like this since Kitchen of India opened two years ago. (The Indian-Nepalese restaurant Mount Everest used to have this location before it relocated to Nottingham.) If so, then that's pretty smart marketing. We tried, and liked, a few things off of the New Additions page, but I don't think we would have if they had been listed under "Chef Specialties."

One of the things we tried, pani poori, I don't remember seeing in another area Indian restaurant. Street snacks in India, they'd make great appetizers to pass around at a party. Served seven to a plate, each hollowed out flour-and-wheat shell is stuffed with spiced mashed potatoes. They get dipped into a masala-spiced water and then popped whole into the mouth. Finding something new on an Indian restaurant menu isn't easy, and it was a good feeling to be surprised.

We also liked another New Addition appetizer, keema naan, which is the traditional bread but stuffed with spiced ground lamb. Savory bits of lamb are distributed throughout the bread, so each bite is delicious. This is a savory treat that does show up with some frequency, but somehow I never think to order it. Another new appetizer, shrimp pakora, was not as refreshing or stimulating as the other two. It was very familiar stuff.

A lot of Kitchen of India is familiar, mostly in a good way. As nice as it was to try new things, the reality is that most of us go looking for our favorites in a place like Kitchen of India, things like chana masala, chicken Jalfrezi and lamb korma.

Even so, we found for our entrees a few dishes that struck us as relative novelties. One of these, a luxurious dish called chicken Xacuti, was described on the menu as being "cooked South Indian style with coconut and mustard seed." Another was a fiery goat Balti, for which the meat gets sauteed with garlic, ginger and tomatoes in a woklike vessel called a karahi. The inclusion of a few goat dishes was another menu surprise, and the Balti preparation is available for both lamb and chicken as well. All of our entrees, which also included a lamb vindaloo, arrived at the table in particularly handsome and coppery tabletop food warmers, a nice touch.

We were pretty full by the time we got to these entrees, and for summer eating, they're heavy going. (The three of us had also tried an appetizer of potato-stuffed samosas, which had a clean-fried taste to them.) They may have sounded different on the menu, but they tasted more or less like other similar preparations in similar restaurants.

For whatever reason, our enthusiasm flagged, just a bit - no permanent converts to Balti or Xacuti. For the record, we also ordered a mixed tandoori grill, which included shrimp, chicken and lamb; it was a gluttonous but rewarding addition.

Kitchen of India has a nice looking room, but it's overly formal for my taste, the kind of room that only really comes alive when it's full (but seldom is). And there's some awkwardness when folks come in for carryout and kind of have to hover in the dining area while they wait for their food. Some wine or beer would have helped, and Kitchen of India is BYOB. Our waiter was sweet and gracious but was working alone when we visited. There were a few moments of wondering where he could have gone.

The young chef-owner here is Mohammad Rahman, who is better known as "Babu." I think Kitchen of India is worth a trip to Parkville. I have a feeling we barely scratched the menu's surface. Nice place.

.

I've dined in at this restaurant and even tried the carry-out. Both times service was horrible. The portions are small compared to other Indian restaurants. The manager has a horrible attitude when you try to talk to him. And the food is never consistent; if you order the same dish, it tastes different every time. Don't waste your time going here!

0
★☆☆☆☆

I've dined in at this restaurant and even tried the carry-out. Both times service was horrible. The portions are small compared to other Indian restaurants. The manager has a horrible attitude when you try to talk to him. And the food is never consistent; if you order the same dish, it tastes different every time. Don't waste your time going here!

Cons: service, portions, price

.

Everest is outstanding. The lunch buffet is the absolute best and very inexpensively priced. The food is amazing. The staff is very nice, kind, respectful and mindful to make sure you have what you need. The lunch buffet is every day of the week, and it seems on Saturday their buffet selections are expanded. Try to get there toward the beginnign of the buffet, between 11 and 12; however, no matter what time I've attended their lunch buffet, I have never been disappointed.

2
★★★★★

Everest is outstanding. The lunch buffet is the absolute best and very inexpensively priced. The food is amazing. The staff is very nice, kind, respectful and mindful to make sure you have what you need. The lunch buffet is every day of the week, and it seems on Saturday their buffet selections are expanded. Try to get there toward the beginnign of the buffet, between 11 and 12; however, no matter what time I've attended their lunch buffet, I have never been disappointed.

Pros: Relaxing/Casual, Outstanding Food, Outstanding Prices

Cons: You will get full.

 

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