Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Morristown Medical Center

★☆☆☆☆
  • 100 Madison Avenue

    Morristown, NJ 07960

    Map & Directions
  • 973-971-6100

About Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Morristown Medical Center

Categories
  • Hospitals
  • Cancer Centers

Health & Medical

Health & Medical
More choices in Morristown:
Resultset_next

Diamond Spring Dental Associates

16 Pocono Rd Denville, NJ

Resultset_next

Cancer Care-St Clairs

23 Pocono Rd Denville, NJ

1.0 1
Hi! Sign in to let us know how Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Morristown Medical Center was?
Write a Review
.

In all fairness, I have met people who have been satisfied with their treatment. This is a doctor-centered & not a patient-centered cancer center; it didn't work for me. I felt disrespected & reduced to such powerlessness that I lost the strength & desire needed to fight my cancer.

I began at the Rippel Breast Center with several stereotactic core breast biopsies. I asked for pain medication; my pain was repeatedly dismissed. I was told that biopsies aren't painful, that I was merely sore & that I should take Tylenol when I got home. My needs were already not being met. I should have taken this as a sign & gone elsewhere.

Some hospitals sedate mastectomy patients prior to an agonizing pre-op radioactive injection into the armpit area. At Morristown Memorial they didn't. Generally, there was little interest in avoiding or alleviating pain.

My surgeon was vague in his commitment to perform a skin sparing mastectomy so that I could have the type of reconstruction (implant versus TRAM Flap) that I wanted. He wasn't honest in answering my questions regarding the injection & post-op drains; he told me what I wanted to hear. After the surgery he didn't tell my husband or me that the cancer had spread to my lymph nodes & that several had been removed. I didn't know why I couldn't raise my arm. Nor were we phoned with pathology results. All of the bad news was delivered more than two weeks later at the post-op check-up.

There was a lot to take in during our meeting with the oncologist. After going home & rereading the pathology report, I phoned to clarify one point. He kept saying, "We already went over this."

A radiation oncologist told me that in general, radiation & reconstruction are incompatible (yet their plastic surgeons successfully perform it all the time) & that in my case, due to an underlying skin problem, reconstruction would be impossible because my skin would be burned beyond salvaging. I was told to choose between reconstruction & increasing my survival odds. She refused to "work with me" on my exceptional case. I wasn't about to have radiation there after a commitment to destroy my skin. I was disappointed that a physician in her position wasn't more of an advocate for mastectomy patients desiring reconstruction. In retrospect, I should have been referred to the oncologist & radiation oncologist before surgery and not after so that I could have made a more informed decision about the surgery.

I didn't want to get an IV port for chemo; I was told that it is mandatory. I asked around & was told by other cancer patients (being treated at other hospitals) that the entire mechanism is put into the chest area, is painless & unnoticeable under clothing. In the OR, this same surgeon informed me that he was going to shove the catheter up my neck. I told him not to do it; the surgery should have been canceled at that moment. I was anesthetized & it was done anyway. It was extremely painful 24/7 & was unsightly; it only added to my self-consciousness.

At this point I ran for my sanity & dignity to a cancer center in Philadelphia that is known for patient empowerment & a whole-patient approach. I met with a Pain Manager who immediately prescribed much needed medication.The port was removed & replaced with a painless one in my chest. (Patient comfort is a priority & they do not use the neck procedure-nor had my surgeon ever seen it done when removing ports put in elsewhere.) I could have attempted chemo without a port, but did the swap because I didn't want to risk a third port procedure. My medical team was committed to giving me a chance at a breast implant & I was monitored during radiation, in case it had to be paused & resumed. I have been kept informed, given choices, and have been the deciding factor in every decision.

Before leaving Morristown Memorial, I confronted a physician who had disregarded my wishes. He said, "It was a medical decision. It had nothing to do with you." He succinctly summed up my entire experience there.

I regret not starting out in Philadelphia; due to their philosophy & strictly enforced policy, none of these things would have happened.

1
★☆☆☆☆

In all fairness, I have met people who have been satisfied with their treatment. This is a doctor-centered & not a patient-centered cancer center; it didn't work for me. I felt disrespected & reduced to such powerlessness that I lost the strength & desire needed to fight my cancer.

I began at the Rippel Breast Center with several stereotactic core breast biopsies. I asked for pain medication; my pain was repeatedly dismissed. I was told that biopsies aren't painful, that I was merely sore & that I should take Tylenol when I got home. My needs were already not being met. I should have taken this as a sign & gone elsewhere.

Some hospitals sedate mastectomy patients prior to an agonizing pre-op radioactive injection into the armpit area. At Morristown Memorial they didn't. Generally, there was little interest in avoiding or alleviating pain.

My surgeon was vague in his commitment to perform a skin sparing mastectomy so that I could have the type of reconstruction (implant versus TRAM Flap) that I wanted. He wasn't honest in answering my questions regarding the injection & post-op drains; he told me what I wanted to hear. After the surgery he didn't tell my husband or me that the cancer had spread to my lymph nodes & that several had been removed. I didn't know why I couldn't raise my arm. Nor were we phoned with pathology results. All of the bad news was delivered more than two weeks later at the post-op check-up.

There was a lot to take in during our meeting with the oncologist. After going home & rereading the pathology report, I phoned to clarify one point. He kept saying, "We already went over this."

A radiation oncologist told me that in general, radiation & reconstruction are incompatible (yet their plastic surgeons successfully perform it all the time) & that in my case, due to an underlying skin problem, reconstruction would be impossible because my skin would be burned beyond salvaging. I was told to choose between reconstruction & increasing my survival odds. She refused to "work with me" on my exceptional case. I wasn't about to have radiation there after a commitment to destroy my skin. I was disappointed that a physician in her position wasn't more of an advocate for mastectomy patients desiring reconstruction. In retrospect, I should have been referred to the oncologist & radiation oncologist before surgery and not after so that I could have made a more informed decision about the surgery.

I didn't want to get an IV port for chemo; I was told that it is mandatory. I asked around & was told by other cancer patients (being treated at other hospitals) that the entire mechanism is put into the chest area, is painless & unnoticeable under clothing. In the OR, this same surgeon informed me that he was going to shove the catheter up my neck. I told him not to do it; the surgery should have been canceled at that moment. I was anesthetized & it was done anyway. It was extremely painful 24/7 & was unsightly; it only added to my self-consciousness.

At this point I ran for my sanity & dignity to a cancer center in Philadelphia that is known for patient empowerment & a whole-patient approach. I met with a Pain Manager who immediately prescribed much needed medication.The port was removed & replaced with a painless one in my chest. (Patient comfort is a priority & they do not use the neck procedure-nor had my surgeon ever seen it done when removing ports put in elsewhere.) I could have attempted chemo without a port, but did the swap because I didn't want to risk a third port procedure. My medical team was committed to giving me a chance at a breast implant & I was monitored during radiation, in case it had to be paused & resumed. I have been kept informed, given choices, and have been the deciding factor in every decision.

Before leaving Morristown Memorial, I confronted a physician who had disregarded my wishes. He said, "It was a medical decision. It had nothing to do with you." He succinctly summed up my entire experience there.

I regret not starting out in Philadelphia; due to their philosophy & strictly enforced policy, none of these things would have happened.

Was this review helpful to you?
Ratings_icons Ratings_icons

 

Wait, you're the expert.

If you've been to or used Carol G. Simon Cancer Center at Morristown Medical Center, leave a review.

It's easy, only takes a couple of minutes and you'll help thousands make an informed decision.



Write a Review