Omega Martial Arts

★★★★☆
  • 17864 Cottonwood Dr

    Parker, CO 80134

    Map & Directions
  • 303-680-3567

About Omega Martial Arts

Hours
Mon 11am-8pm, Wed 11am-8pm, Tue 9am-8:30pm, Thu 9am-8:30pm, Fri 6:30pm-7:30pm, Sat 9am-12pm
3.625 16
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I would like to respond to Ralph H.
First, the physical ability of a person has little to nothing to do with their knowledge. Your suggestion that one's physical limitations prohibits that individual's ability to teach is pathetic. Are you to suggest that all those with physical abnormalities should not teach? No blind teachers? Should those with physical limitations then not bother to study martial arts either? Omega has a black belt student named Buddy with multiple physical handicaps; they altered the program for him to be successful. But, then again, he can't really be a black belt because he is in a wheelchair. Omega has always supported those with physical and mental limitations; just because you don't care doesn't mean you should trash those that do.

Perhaps you should have attended some adult classes if you feel uncomfortable around children. Omega has quite a few adult students. Keep in mind the attendance in classes changes on a week to week basis. Adults must work for a living and thus are not as consistant in their class attendance.

As for the Master instructor you refer to as being in his 20's, isn't it terrible when a person ages better than we do? That instructor is a 5th dan, he is in his 30's, and he has been training since he was 3 years old. He did not recieve his black belt at ten, and, if you took the time to add up the time in rank requirements for each dan black belt, you would see he has more than the right amount of time for the rank he posseses. Omega has two lady Masters over the age of 50. They only have a few years on the male master. But then, how could one with no training possibly see that? Or rather, how could one with no training pass judgement?

Omega has had an active weapons class for years. Monday nights. Your statement is an outright lie if you claim someone told you there was no such class.

It is a shame that you and your wife felt uncomfortable. But, in the words of a very wise man-Some people grace your life by entering it, Some by leaving it. Have a good one.

Lastly, for all those questioning the validity of Soke's PhD: It is an honorary title for martial artists. Who cares if he can't teach at a college with it? Has he expressed the desire to do so? This is a title, like Master or Shihan, that he has earned from his years in and contribution to the arts. He did have to submit a thesis and lifetime record of his training. They hand out honorary degrees to the likes of neophytes, like Obama, yet you dispute this. Really. When Bob Davis applies for a college math faculty position, then we can worry about it. Get a life.

5
★★★★★

I would like to respond to Ralph H.
First, the physical ability of a person has little to nothing to do with their knowledge. Your suggestion that one's physical limitations prohibits that individual's ability to teach is pathetic. Are you to suggest that all those with physical abnormalities should not teach? No blind teachers? Should those with physical limitations then not bother to study martial arts either? Omega has a black belt student named Buddy with multiple physical handicaps; they altered the program for him to be successful. But, then again, he can't really be a black belt because he is in a wheelchair. Omega has always supported those with physical and mental limitations; just because you don't care doesn't mean you should trash those that do.

Perhaps you should have attended some adult classes if you feel uncomfortable around children. Omega has quite a few adult students. Keep in mind the attendance in classes changes on a week to week basis. Adults must work for a living and thus are not as consistant in their class attendance.

As for the Master instructor you refer to as being in his 20's, isn't it terrible when a person ages better than we do? That instructor is a 5th dan, he is in his 30's, and he has been training since he was 3 years old. He did not recieve his black belt at ten, and, if you took the time to add up the time in rank requirements for each dan black belt, you would see he has more than the right amount of time for the rank he posseses. Omega has two lady Masters over the age of 50. They only have a few years on the male master. But then, how could one with no training possibly see that? Or rather, how could one with no training pass judgement?

Omega has had an active weapons class for years. Monday nights. Your statement is an outright lie if you claim someone told you there was no such class.

It is a shame that you and your wife felt uncomfortable. But, in the words of a very wise man-Some people grace your life by entering it, Some by leaving it. Have a good one.

Lastly, for all those questioning the validity of Soke's PhD: It is an honorary title for martial artists. Who cares if he can't teach at a college with it? Has he expressed the desire to do so? This is a title, like Master or Shihan, that he has earned from his years in and contribution to the arts. He did have to submit a thesis and lifetime record of his training. They hand out honorary degrees to the likes of neophytes, like Obama, yet you dispute this. Really. When Bob Davis applies for a college math faculty position, then we can worry about it. Get a life.

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First, I am an experienced karateka with 26 years in the martial arts and a school of my own.

I noticed the comments below talking about "delaying tactics and how "reputable" schools get you to black belt in 2 years and another on how "all" international organizations recognize a 3 year time frame.

While true in one aspect, this is also a bunch of bull. For example, the Dai Nippon Butoku kai, an international organization in Japan, considers a time frame of 2- 3 years to black belt . These ttimes seem to match the statements below until you consider this time frame is based on the following conditions.

1. A student attends classes (Assuming a class length of at least 2 hours ) 4- 5 times a week

2. An average a total training time per week of 15-20 hours.

Since most people do NOT train at this level it usually takes 4-7 years to make black belt under schools following their recommendations.

Schools promising a black belt in 2 years are what we call a belt factory. They use accelerated testing schedules to keep people paying their monthly fees. I've seen black belts from such schools get their lunch eaten be green belts from a more reputable school.

Although there are things at Omega I disagree with as I teach a different style, I will stand by their decision to have a 4-6 year black belt program.

If a person trained with me and was a dedicated student that worked hard, practiced on their own, and came to class 2 times a week, it would take 5-7 years for such a person to make black belt.

A black belt is not a right you earn by paying money, it is a goal you achieve through hard work and dedication.

3
★★★☆☆

First, I am an experienced karateka with 26 years in the martial arts and a school of my own.

I noticed the comments below talking about "delaying tactics and how "reputable" schools get you to black belt in 2 years and another on how "all" international organizations recognize a 3 year time frame.

While true in one aspect, this is also a bunch of bull. For example, the Dai Nippon Butoku kai, an international organization in Japan, considers a time frame of 2- 3 years to black belt . These ttimes seem to match the statements below until you consider this time frame is based on the following conditions.

1. A student attends classes (Assuming a class length of at least 2 hours ) 4- 5 times a week

2. An average a total training time per week of 15-20 hours.

Since most people do NOT train at this level it usually takes 4-7 years to make black belt under schools following their recommendations.

Schools promising a black belt in 2 years are what we call a belt factory. They use accelerated testing schedules to keep people paying their monthly fees. I've seen black belts from such schools get their lunch eaten be green belts from a more reputable school.

Although there are things at Omega I disagree with as I teach a different style, I will stand by their decision to have a 4-6 year black belt program.

If a person trained with me and was a dedicated student that worked hard, practiced on their own, and came to class 2 times a week, it would take 5-7 years for such a person to make black belt.

A black belt is not a right you earn by paying money, it is a goal you achieve through hard work and dedication.

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It amazes me how someone can claim anything on the internet. I have researched our files and find no instructor with the initials SW. It also amazes me that someone can speak to my finance condition. I as owner have not taken a check from Omega for several years so we can keep our fees low for the many families we have as students. Test fees for colored belts are 20-25 dollars well below the average in the Martial arts. If SW or anyone else wishes to look at our books to verify my income I will willingly share this information. I do not teach Martial Arts to make money but to help others.

A Shodan-ho [1 year temporary Black Belt] has been the norm in many systems. It helps a person grow into their Black Belt and decide if they want to really be an instructor. [SW this is the real meaning of Black Belt]

Our test fees for the temporary and 1st degree added together are still less than most schools fee for 1st degree.

My PhD can be checked out by anyone. Eurotec university has been the source for many very famous Black Belts PhD??s. If interested call me and I will share the Chancellors number so you can verify it. If you wish contact the USJJIF president Master Bruce Bethers to check on my credentials. I have practiced for over 40 years and I am now 64 years old. I still teach on regular bases and spar all my students when sparring classes are offered.

We do not claim to teach the modern sport of TKD. My instructor taught me the old style TKD which was for self-defense not sport. Omega students have gone on to achieve great things because we give them a good foundation to build on.

Omega does not use many of the new tactics incorporated by other schools because I feel a monthly fee is all you should pay. Having to pay extra for special clubs, etc is not the Omega Way.

SW please feel free to come in and talk with me about your feelings anytime. Please do not represent yourself as one of my instructors!

Bob Davis owner and founder
Omega Martial Arts

5
★★★★★

It amazes me how someone can claim anything on the internet. I have researched our files and find no instructor with the initials SW. It also amazes me that someone can speak to my finance condition. I as owner have not taken a check from Omega for several years so we can keep our fees low for the many families we have as students. Test fees for colored belts are 20-25 dollars well below the average in the Martial arts. If SW or anyone else wishes to look at our books to verify my income I will willingly share this information. I do not teach Martial Arts to make money but to help others.

A Shodan-ho [1 year temporary Black Belt] has been the norm in many systems. It helps a person grow into their Black Belt and decide if they want to really be an instructor. [SW this is the real meaning of Black Belt]

Our test fees for the temporary and 1st degree added together are still less than most schools fee for 1st degree.

My PhD can be checked out by anyone. Eurotec university has been the source for many very famous Black Belts PhD??s. If interested call me and I will share the Chancellors number so you can verify it. If you wish contact the USJJIF president Master Bruce Bethers to check on my credentials. I have practiced for over 40 years and I am now 64 years old. I still teach on regular bases and spar all my students when sparring classes are offered.

We do not claim to teach the modern sport of TKD. My instructor taught me the old style TKD which was for self-defense not sport. Omega students have gone on to achieve great things because we give them a good foundation to build on.

Omega does not use many of the new tactics incorporated by other schools because I feel a monthly fee is all you should pay. Having to pay extra for special clubs, etc is not the Omega Way.

SW please feel free to come in and talk with me about your feelings anytime. Please do not represent yourself as one of my instructors!

Bob Davis owner and founder
Omega Martial Arts

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I was surprised that you responded to my review. My original review remains below. I can say that SW is my anonymous internet alias, I prefer not to share my real identity on the www. I would also say that you seem to have misunderstood what I stated in my post-- let me clarify: testing fees, the number of belts, the number of stripes all are ways that schools in general do two things: one, they are a source of income, two they are a way to provide encouragement, particularly with kids. They are a useful tool. Some people automatically think this is a negative thing when it in fact is not. Unless the school takes advantage of it as a source of income. I acknowledge that for Omega the fee is lower and it is a nominal source of income for a weekend day of dedication from instructors. I DO not think Omega Karate is in it for the money and I did not say that in my prior posting. I DID state that Omega has used the temporary black belt system since BEFORE the owner made any money whatsoever from the school. The reason I said this is to highlight that it is NOT a moneymaking tactic which some earlier posters stated it to be. The purpose of the temporary black belt is to provide a system and means of encouraging and nurturing young black belts into experienced and capable role models and teachers. The temporary black belt system is a good system. The emphasis should not be on the word temporary. If a student from another system came to my school with a "temporary black belt", it would be honored. It would be the same from any qualified teacher. The temporary black belt is not a tool from which to intimidate or coerce students into paying longer. I knew several people who left the school after shodan-ho who came back and of course they were not made to wear a colored belt again. They were, however, of lower rank than those who had gone on to gain a year of experience and test for shodan. Testing fees were always reasonable when I was there. The ways that Omega adds income, testing fees, tournament fees, are nominal and better than the average family oriented school. Schools that have ZERO testing fees more typically (with exceptions of course) have fewer students and those students have less self control.

We will have to agree to disagree about the credibility of your doctorate. I personally do not believe a person should get a doctorate in their field just because they have spent 30 years or so in it. Doctor's of martial arts? Doctor's of auto mechanics next? You would not be allowed to teach at a junior college with that particular "doctorate". I stated that this claim and others disappointed me. I will leave it at that.

Omega may be a good choice for a family oriented experience if you are interested in general martial arts and not an experience specifically in a martial art or martial sport.

original post:

I was an instructor at Omega Karate for some time. I will say this: it is not the same. Some people are under the impression that Omega tries to prolong the time it takes to level to blackbelt in order to increase profits. Omega has been using the temporary black belt system since before the school generated any income and before it was the sole source for the owner. The system is designed to help someone mature into a more knowledgeable instructor competent enough to guide a class on their own. Still, there are many other tactics that they and most financially successful schools do use to maximize income. I will not say they are dishonest or in it just for the money. There are always many blackbelted instructors and assistants that do NOT get paid. It is a family oriented Christianity based program. However, in martial arts, the ego is a monster and I find it sad that the owner finds it okay to call himself a doctor and I find other credentials and claims disappointing as well. Also, the art is truly based in Tang Soo Do and Moo Duk Kwan one of the 9 schools that merged to form TKD a few decades ago. It was then influenced by American style point karate and somewhat by traditional Karate and Olympic TKD. Unfortunately, the school is a jack of many trades and is not highly proficient in any of these. You will not learn high quality Taekwondo, nor Traditional Karate, nor become highly skilled in kickboxing or jiujitsu. They also seem to think the "World Championships" are on an island every year and that a dozen or so schools deserve to attend. I find this morally reprehensible and a false sense of esteem. The school can offer a well rounded base from which you can branch out if you find one aspect you most enjoy. Examples: former students of omega actually HAVE gone on to compete in the Olympic trials, to open their own schools and most importantly many have had life changing experiences and found confidence and self-esteem.

3
★★★☆☆

I was surprised that you responded to my review. My original review remains below. I can say that SW is my anonymous internet alias, I prefer not to share my real identity on the www. I would also say that you seem to have misunderstood what I stated in my post-- let me clarify: testing fees, the number of belts, the number of stripes all are ways that schools in general do two things: one, they are a source of income, two they are a way to provide encouragement, particularly with kids. They are a useful tool. Some people automatically think this is a negative thing when it in fact is not. Unless the school takes advantage of it as a source of income. I acknowledge that for Omega the fee is lower and it is a nominal source of income for a weekend day of dedication from instructors. I DO not think Omega Karate is in it for the money and I did not say that in my prior posting. I DID state that Omega has used the temporary black belt system since BEFORE the owner made any money whatsoever from the school. The reason I said this is to highlight that it is NOT a moneymaking tactic which some earlier posters stated it to be. The purpose of the temporary black belt is to provide a system and means of encouraging and nurturing young black belts into experienced and capable role models and teachers. The temporary black belt system is a good system. The emphasis should not be on the word temporary. If a student from another system came to my school with a "temporary black belt", it would be honored. It would be the same from any qualified teacher. The temporary black belt is not a tool from which to intimidate or coerce students into paying longer. I knew several people who left the school after shodan-ho who came back and of course they were not made to wear a colored belt again. They were, however, of lower rank than those who had gone on to gain a year of experience and test for shodan. Testing fees were always reasonable when I was there. The ways that Omega adds income, testing fees, tournament fees, are nominal and better than the average family oriented school. Schools that have ZERO testing fees more typically (with exceptions of course) have fewer students and those students have less self control.

We will have to agree to disagree about the credibility of your doctorate. I personally do not believe a person should get a doctorate in their field just because they have spent 30 years or so in it. Doctor's of martial arts? Doctor's of auto mechanics next? You would not be allowed to teach at a junior college with that particular "doctorate". I stated that this claim and others disappointed me. I will leave it at that.

Omega may be a good choice for a family oriented experience if you are interested in general martial arts and not an experience specifically in a martial art or martial sport.

original post:

I was an instructor at Omega Karate for some time. I will say this: it is not the same. Some people are under the impression that Omega tries to prolong the time it takes to level to blackbelt in order to increase profits. Omega has been using the temporary black belt system since before the school generated any income and before it was the sole source for the owner. The system is designed to help someone mature into a more knowledgeable instructor competent enough to guide a class on their own. Still, there are many other tactics that they and most financially successful schools do use to maximize income. I will not say they are dishonest or in it just for the money. There are always many blackbelted instructors and assistants that do NOT get paid. It is a family oriented Christianity based program. However, in martial arts, the ego is a monster and I find it sad that the owner finds it okay to call himself a doctor and I find other credentials and claims disappointing as well. Also, the art is truly based in Tang Soo Do and Moo Duk Kwan one of the 9 schools that merged to form TKD a few decades ago. It was then influenced by American style point karate and somewhat by traditional Karate and Olympic TKD. Unfortunately, the school is a jack of many trades and is not highly proficient in any of these. You will not learn high quality Taekwondo, nor Traditional Karate, nor become highly skilled in kickboxing or jiujitsu. They also seem to think the "World Championships" are on an island every year and that a dozen or so schools deserve to attend. I find this morally reprehensible and a false sense of esteem. The school can offer a well rounded base from which you can branch out if you find one aspect you most enjoy. Examples: former students of omega actually HAVE gone on to compete in the Olympic trials, to open their own schools and most importantly many have had life changing experiences and found confidence and self-esteem.

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I looked at this place for my wife and I. We each did Tae Kwon Do in college and wanted to continue now that we were settled in an apartment. I stopped in and met a few people that were friendly enough. There were a lot of kids though and I kind of felt out of place.

My wife came in separate from me and talked to a small number of people too. She had the same major comment - a lot of kids. And there was one guy there that was supposed to be an instructor that just creeped her out.

The owner of the school is supposed to be a master TKD instructor but from the way he moved he just looked more like a gimp. He seemed to have some kind of bum leg or something and the next highest senior instructor that my wife saw, some woman, looked like she had a backache that would preclude any kind of TKD.

My wife and I compared notes on the school about what we saw. The curriculum looked kind of sketchy and once you got to black belt the number of kata seemed to triple. We both agreed that they weren't a TKD school but a MMA school.

My wife has an interest in weapons and came on the night that they were supposed to have a weapons class. Didn't see any weapons students or instructor though. She asked and was told they don't have a weapons night anymore. Clearly it was on the schedule though and on their website.

There as one 4th degree black belt that I talked to. Some kid in his early twenties I would guess. Don't know how he managed to get to that rank at such a young age. He claimed that his father, the owner, taught him and that he was inheriting the system from him and he was going to be in charge. The more he talked the less interested I became.

We also agreed that there were too many kids and not enough adults for us. We were uncomfortable being in a class with so many kids and so few adults. It was almost like being in a day care center especially the way the instructors acted towards the adults. There was this one instructor that my wife saw, a tall lanky older guy. My wife said something about the way he interacted with the kids and it creeped her out.

Not the place if your looking for TKD or anything that is legitimately recognized in the USA or world-wide. They definetely need to work on recatagorizing who or what they are. The class schedule is a mess.

1
★☆☆☆☆

I looked at this place for my wife and I. We each did Tae Kwon Do in college and wanted to continue now that we were settled in an apartment. I stopped in and met a few people that were friendly enough. There were a lot of kids though and I kind of felt out of place.

My wife came in separate from me and talked to a small number of people too. She had the same major comment - a lot of kids. And there was one guy there that was supposed to be an instructor that just creeped her out.

The owner of the school is supposed to be a master TKD instructor but from the way he moved he just looked more like a gimp. He seemed to have some kind of bum leg or something and the next highest senior instructor that my wife saw, some woman, looked like she had a backache that would preclude any kind of TKD.

My wife and I compared notes on the school about what we saw. The curriculum looked kind of sketchy and once you got to black belt the number of kata seemed to triple. We both agreed that they weren't a TKD school but a MMA school.

My wife has an interest in weapons and came on the night that they were supposed to have a weapons class. Didn't see any weapons students or instructor though. She asked and was told they don't have a weapons night anymore. Clearly it was on the schedule though and on their website.

There as one 4th degree black belt that I talked to. Some kid in his early twenties I would guess. Don't know how he managed to get to that rank at such a young age. He claimed that his father, the owner, taught him and that he was inheriting the system from him and he was going to be in charge. The more he talked the less interested I became.

We also agreed that there were too many kids and not enough adults for us. We were uncomfortable being in a class with so many kids and so few adults. It was almost like being in a day care center especially the way the instructors acted towards the adults. There was this one instructor that my wife saw, a tall lanky older guy. My wife said something about the way he interacted with the kids and it creeped her out.

Not the place if your looking for TKD or anything that is legitimately recognized in the USA or world-wide. They definetely need to work on recatagorizing who or what they are. The class schedule is a mess.

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I have had the opportunity to be a member of Omega martial arts for years. They are very family-oriented, and they take a positive teaching approach throughout.

It is disconcerting to see reviewers state displeasure for the length of time to get to black belt. It isn't a race! I have seen black belts from other systems who lack fundamentals when it comes to balance, stances and techniques. I've even seen high belts that still struggle with it at Omega...but those are corrected in that brown belt maturation process to black belt.

I like to visit other taekwondo schools when traveling. I am shocked at the lack of excellence in many schools. I recently said that I had been taking taekwondo for 5 years, and someone asked if I was a 2nd Dan...or 3rd. I couldn't believe it. How can you justify a 2nd or 3rd Dan in just 5 years?

In our fast-food society, Omega goes against the trend of rewarding students with a quick ride to black belt. Going against that trend could easily have a negative impact to Omega's revenue opportunities as people pursue their fast-track to black belt elsewhere...yet the owner is sticking to his principles of trying to generate mature, skilled black belts.

Some students may become disgruntled because they feel exceptions should be made to the timeline. In some cases, a couple of these students are good bordering on the exceptional. However, opening the door to exceptions then leads to a flood of students requesting the exception or accusations of preferential treatment.

In addition to having a structured curriculum, Omega also has a Board of Inquiry where prospective black belts must "present their case"...along with papers and letters of reference...before being allowed to test. I doubt it gets more organized or formal than that process in other schools.

I would gladly recommend Omega martial arts...with the caveat that it is definitely not the fast lane to black belt.

PROS: Cost-appropriate, family oriented, structured curriculum
CONS:

4
★★★★☆

I have had the opportunity to be a member of Omega martial arts for years. They are very family-oriented, and they take a positive teaching approach throughout.

It is disconcerting to see reviewers state displeasure for the length of time to get to black belt. It isn't a race! I have seen black belts from other systems who lack fundamentals when it comes to balance, stances and techniques. I've even seen high belts that still struggle with it at Omega...but those are corrected in that brown belt maturation process to black belt.

I like to visit other taekwondo schools when traveling. I am shocked at the lack of excellence in many schools. I recently said that I had been taking taekwondo for 5 years, and someone asked if I was a 2nd Dan...or 3rd. I couldn't believe it. How can you justify a 2nd or 3rd Dan in just 5 years?

In our fast-food society, Omega goes against the trend of rewarding students with a quick ride to black belt. Going against that trend could easily have a negative impact to Omega's revenue opportunities as people pursue their fast-track to black belt elsewhere...yet the owner is sticking to his principles of trying to generate mature, skilled black belts.

Some students may become disgruntled because they feel exceptions should be made to the timeline. In some cases, a couple of these students are good bordering on the exceptional. However, opening the door to exceptions then leads to a flood of students requesting the exception or accusations of preferential treatment.

In addition to having a structured curriculum, Omega also has a Board of Inquiry where prospective black belts must "present their case"...along with papers and letters of reference...before being allowed to test. I doubt it gets more organized or formal than that process in other schools.

I would gladly recommend Omega martial arts...with the caveat that it is definitely not the fast lane to black belt.

PROS: Cost-appropriate, family oriented, structured curriculum
CONS:

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I feel that this place is not a school, but instead a money generator for the owner. I have found that they have many delay tactics to prolong the process to black belt, which can extend the process up to 6 years. All internationally recognized organizations typically takes about 3 years to get to black belt.

The owner and head instructor of the school claims to be a "doctor", but looking in to the matter further I found the institution which he "achieved" his degree is a non-accredited school and it was run out of the basement of a man?s house in Hawaii.

The school says that it is trying to create better black belts, but after seeing a number of the black belts in competition I was not impressed. Some of the delay tactics of this school include creating a brown belt system that takes up to 2 years to finish and a temporary black belt that can take an additional year or more to complete. Other systems have a similar belt called Cho Dan Bo which is a pretest to get to black belt, but it does not take a or more year to complete, instead it is figured in to the testing process and takes 4 months to complete. Other schools do not recognize the Omega temporary black belt and a person will be forced to start over at the belt before black belt. This allows Omega to lock students in to staying until 1st degree black belt.

I know of many senior level students that have quit martial arts completely or have moved to other martial schools that did not enjoy the process at Omega.

I would not recommend this school because it cheats and lies to the students. Though I believe that martial arts is wonderful, but should be achieved at a reputable school of which there are many in the area.

PROS: very cheap, but no other positives that I have seen
CONS: prolonged black belt and not internationally recognized

1
★☆☆☆☆

I feel that this place is not a school, but instead a money generator for the owner. I have found that they have many delay tactics to prolong the process to black belt, which can extend the process up to 6 years. All internationally recognized organizations typically takes about 3 years to get to black belt.

The owner and head instructor of the school claims to be a "doctor", but looking in to the matter further I found the institution which he "achieved" his degree is a non-accredited school and it was run out of the basement of a man?s house in Hawaii.

The school says that it is trying to create better black belts, but after seeing a number of the black belts in competition I was not impressed. Some of the delay tactics of this school include creating a brown belt system that takes up to 2 years to finish and a temporary black belt that can take an additional year or more to complete. Other systems have a similar belt called Cho Dan Bo which is a pretest to get to black belt, but it does not take a or more year to complete, instead it is figured in to the testing process and takes 4 months to complete. Other schools do not recognize the Omega temporary black belt and a person will be forced to start over at the belt before black belt. This allows Omega to lock students in to staying until 1st degree black belt.

I know of many senior level students that have quit martial arts completely or have moved to other martial schools that did not enjoy the process at Omega.

I would not recommend this school because it cheats and lies to the students. Though I believe that martial arts is wonderful, but should be achieved at a reputable school of which there are many in the area.

PROS: very cheap, but no other positives that I have seen
CONS: prolonged black belt and not internationally recognized

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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Omega Martial Arts is a family friendly school that offers training six days a week, fitting into just about any schedule. Most of our family members already had black belts when we joined Omega. The school recognized our belts though they were from another system. We had attended several other schools over the 10 years we had been doing martial arts. We joined Omega because they offered a variety of classes that fit into our schedule and it was affordable for the entire family. It does take a bit longer than most other martial arts schools to attain 1st degree, I would estimate the average person will take about four and half years at Omega, six and a half if starting as a young child. But the goal is not just getting a black belt but learning self defense. The students range from 4 year old kid kickers to 80+ adults. I do not know what the person who commented on too many kids and no adults was talking about because in the 2+ years we have been at Omega, lack of adult black belts helping has never been an issue. I am not sure of the numbers but I would estimate there are more than twenty adult black belts teaching and helping teach at Omega and that is not counting the young adults black belt helpers. Omega Martial Arts has also developed programs to help the disabled participate and progress in their program. As I said, it is not all about earning a black belt.

PROS: Affordable, Family Environment
CONS:

4
★★★★☆

Omega Martial Arts is a family friendly school that offers training six days a week, fitting into just about any schedule. Most of our family members already had black belts when we joined Omega. The school recognized our belts though they were from another system. We had attended several other schools over the 10 years we had been doing martial arts. We joined Omega because they offered a variety of classes that fit into our schedule and it was affordable for the entire family. It does take a bit longer than most other martial arts schools to attain 1st degree, I would estimate the average person will take about four and half years at Omega, six and a half if starting as a young child. But the goal is not just getting a black belt but learning self defense. The students range from 4 year old kid kickers to 80+ adults. I do not know what the person who commented on too many kids and no adults was talking about because in the 2+ years we have been at Omega, lack of adult black belts helping has never been an issue. I am not sure of the numbers but I would estimate there are more than twenty adult black belts teaching and helping teach at Omega and that is not counting the young adults black belt helpers. Omega Martial Arts has also developed programs to help the disabled participate and progress in their program. As I said, it is not all about earning a black belt.

PROS: Affordable, Family Environment
CONS:

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0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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I am nearly sixteen i have been doing martial arts for 11 years i have gone to five or six differnet schools i have been to tons of tournaments i have gone to the dominican republic for martial arts so i know the difference in karate. Omega has a very family orented bases it has lots of classes and it helps you to learn self-defence which is very good in every aspect of life it teaches respect and disipline. Dr.Davis is very knoledgable and quiet his wife Ms.Kathy is very good with kids his son can teach my three and a half year old sister how to do the kicks and punches.i didnt earn my black belt there but i have seen others who have. they are great blackbelts they know what they are talking about and know how to teach it. Omega isnt trying to get people in for money its trying to get people in to help people stay safe and hae fun. some kids run around because they are having fun and are excited. it does take time to get blakc belt and that is so the students who do make it arent incompitent boobs BSing what they teach i mean if it took a year like some school i have seen my three year old sister would be a first degree at four...who would want to learn from a four year old??? i am not saying Omega is the god of martial arts schools it has flaws which i can see are being taken care of but doesnt everything have flaws in it? it is a very good school and i highly recommend it to anyone who wants to learn martial arts.

PROS: family based helps kids
CONS: isnt god but is trying to improve

4
★★★★☆

I am nearly sixteen i have been doing martial arts for 11 years i have gone to five or six differnet schools i have been to tons of tournaments i have gone to the dominican republic for martial arts so i know the difference in karate. Omega has a very family orented bases it has lots of classes and it helps you to learn self-defence which is very good in every aspect of life it teaches respect and disipline. Dr.Davis is very knoledgable and quiet his wife Ms.Kathy is very good with kids his son can teach my three and a half year old sister how to do the kicks and punches.i didnt earn my black belt there but i have seen others who have. they are great blackbelts they know what they are talking about and know how to teach it. Omega isnt trying to get people in for money its trying to get people in to help people stay safe and hae fun. some kids run around because they are having fun and are excited. it does take time to get blakc belt and that is so the students who do make it arent incompitent boobs BSing what they teach i mean if it took a year like some school i have seen my three year old sister would be a first degree at four...who would want to learn from a four year old??? i am not saying Omega is the god of martial arts schools it has flaws which i can see are being taken care of but doesnt everything have flaws in it? it is a very good school and i highly recommend it to anyone who wants to learn martial arts.

PROS: family based helps kids
CONS: isnt god but is trying to improve

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Omega Martial Arts lacks the integrity of an honest and reputable martial arts school. The owner of the school, Robert Davis, professes to have a doctorate degree, however, this was a "piece of paper" that he purchased from Eurotechnical Research University, a non-accredited organization and no longer in business. Mr. Davis also professes to have a 10th degree black belt; however, the time scale on his own website does not make that seem logical.

Additionally, Omega has a program that purposely delays a person earning their 1st degree black belt to extend the schools revenue stream. They have a "temporary" black belt which then requires the student to wait another full year or more to test for their 1st degree black belt. The black belt program at Omega will take a student more then four years to attain their 1st degree black belt, up to two years longer then any of the other reputable martial arts schools.

Omega is associated with World Congress of Martial Arts (WCMA), a no-name martial arts organization. In fact, WCMA encourages and supports their members in "purchasing" non-accredited college degrees.

Look for honest martial arts school associated with either the World Tae-Kwon-Do Federation (WTF) or the International Tae-Kwon-Do Federation (ITF), both of which have the integrity and reputation for providing quality martial arts training. I would strongly recommend avoiding Omega Martial Arts or any organization associated with World Congress of Martial Arts.

PROS: Family oriented
CONS: Lack of integrity and honesty, 4+ years to 1st degree

1
★☆☆☆☆

Omega Martial Arts lacks the integrity of an honest and reputable martial arts school. The owner of the school, Robert Davis, professes to have a doctorate degree, however, this was a "piece of paper" that he purchased from Eurotechnical Research University, a non-accredited organization and no longer in business. Mr. Davis also professes to have a 10th degree black belt; however, the time scale on his own website does not make that seem logical.

Additionally, Omega has a program that purposely delays a person earning their 1st degree black belt to extend the schools revenue stream. They have a "temporary" black belt which then requires the student to wait another full year or more to test for their 1st degree black belt. The black belt program at Omega will take a student more then four years to attain their 1st degree black belt, up to two years longer then any of the other reputable martial arts schools.

Omega is associated with World Congress of Martial Arts (WCMA), a no-name martial arts organization. In fact, WCMA encourages and supports their members in "purchasing" non-accredited college degrees.

Look for honest martial arts school associated with either the World Tae-Kwon-Do Federation (WTF) or the International Tae-Kwon-Do Federation (ITF), both of which have the integrity and reputation for providing quality martial arts training. I would strongly recommend avoiding Omega Martial Arts or any organization associated with World Congress of Martial Arts.

PROS: Family oriented
CONS: Lack of integrity and honesty, 4+ years to 1st degree

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I am a 13 year old i am now a yellow belt and i didn't think that i would like it at first but, i was wrong i love the classes and the people that go.
Self-defence is one of the most important thing that you need to know when you are a teen...the omega school teaches that and it teaches you that you need your space. They have many good instructors. If you are a family/member at the Omega school then you know that it is one big family.

5
★★★★★

I am a 13 year old i am now a yellow belt and i didn't think that i would like it at first but, i was wrong i love the classes and the people that go.
Self-defence is one of the most important thing that you need to know when you are a teen...the omega school teaches that and it teaches you that you need your space. They have many good instructors. If you are a family/member at the Omega school then you know that it is one big family.

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This school teaches respect - this is obvious when you come in and find children and adults all adressing each other as sir / maam /

They teach real world self defense along with traditional martial arts. They offer not only the traditional basic's that every martial artist must learn, but there are many other additional classes availabe to the students that you can find no place else.

Besides the traditional Tae Kwon Do system they teach the basics of most weapons / the also have a traditional Kobodo weapons class/ they have judo, kick boxing, Extream martial arts, specialized classes for kids 4-8.

Over all this is a great school with a great feel

5
★★★★★

This school teaches respect - this is obvious when you come in and find children and adults all adressing each other as sir / maam /

They teach real world self defense along with traditional martial arts. They offer not only the traditional basic's that every martial artist must learn, but there are many other additional classes availabe to the students that you can find no place else.

Besides the traditional Tae Kwon Do system they teach the basics of most weapons / the also have a traditional Kobodo weapons class/ they have judo, kick boxing, Extream martial arts, specialized classes for kids 4-8.

Over all this is a great school with a great feel

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Great blend of martial arts... They teach you the strengths and weaknesses in every system including their own i.e. no false teaching here. Wonderful with kids. Prices are very good and lend itself very well to family practice. There is a nice mixture of adults and kids. There are adult only classes most days if you would like.

Great school I recommend it to everone.

PROS: Great system, Trained Instructors, Family friendly, Flexible Schedule
CONS:

5
★★★★★

Great blend of martial arts... They teach you the strengths and weaknesses in every system including their own i.e. no false teaching here. Wonderful with kids. Prices are very good and lend itself very well to family practice. There is a nice mixture of adults and kids. There are adult only classes most days if you would like.

Great school I recommend it to everone.

PROS: Great system, Trained Instructors, Family friendly, Flexible Schedule
CONS:

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0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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This a great school for both beginning and experienced martial artists.

First and foremost, this is a family oriented martial arts school. All the instructors are as dedicated to teaching children as they are teaching adults. In addition, they also offer instruction for special needs individuals.

While other taekwondo schools may focus specifically on the sport of taekwondo/judo, Omega Martial Arts has a very balanced curriculm focused on practical self defense and taekwondo/judo. Even as a beginner, you are taught self defense techniques that can be applied immediately and effectively.

Highlights:
- VERY family oriented (great for individuals and/or families)
- Most instructors are trained in more than just taekwondo
- Teaches self defense techniques at all levels
- Instructors encourage students to 'be creative' and adapt the lessons to various situations
- Classes for all levels are offered at many various times to compliment almost all schedules
- Very organized and thought-out lesson plans
- Contracts are available but are incredibly flexible (again, family oriented)
- Offer a combined program of Taekwondo and Judo (among others)

PROS: Very family oriented; Strong focus on self defense; Great Instructors
CONS: Somewhat scattered scheduling of classes (Pro & Con)

5
★★★★★

This a great school for both beginning and experienced martial artists.

First and foremost, this is a family oriented martial arts school. All the instructors are as dedicated to teaching children as they are teaching adults. In addition, they also offer instruction for special needs individuals.

While other taekwondo schools may focus specifically on the sport of taekwondo/judo, Omega Martial Arts has a very balanced curriculm focused on practical self defense and taekwondo/judo. Even as a beginner, you are taught self defense techniques that can be applied immediately and effectively.

Highlights:
- VERY family oriented (great for individuals and/or families)
- Most instructors are trained in more than just taekwondo
- Teaches self defense techniques at all levels
- Instructors encourage students to 'be creative' and adapt the lessons to various situations
- Classes for all levels are offered at many various times to compliment almost all schedules
- Very organized and thought-out lesson plans
- Contracts are available but are incredibly flexible (again, family oriented)
- Offer a combined program of Taekwondo and Judo (among others)

PROS: Very family oriented; Strong focus on self defense; Great Instructors
CONS: Somewhat scattered scheduling of classes (Pro & Con)

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I stopped here to check out the school for my kid. I decided that the place was run more like a day care center than a martial arts school. I did see a lot of kids my son's age but most of them were running around.

I talked to the management and they suggest a I take a free class with my son. I just got the feeling that they wanted me to sign up the whole family. They say no contract but that was kind of hard to believe.

I watched a couple of classes and thought that the whole thing looked a bit shabby. I had done martial arts for eight years before I damaged my knee in a bicycle accident. My martials arts is slowed up some since then. This place didn't have any real physical workouts despite what I was told.

To be fair I did come back a second time with my kid so that he could see what they were all about. My kid is 9 years old and kids are pretty smart given the chance. He wasn't impressed either.

I'd skip this place if your looking for a martial arts school.

PROS: lots of kids, some variety, a few adults
CONS: few adults, not much martial art, no work out

2
★★☆☆☆

I stopped here to check out the school for my kid. I decided that the place was run more like a day care center than a martial arts school. I did see a lot of kids my son's age but most of them were running around.

I talked to the management and they suggest a I take a free class with my son. I just got the feeling that they wanted me to sign up the whole family. They say no contract but that was kind of hard to believe.

I watched a couple of classes and thought that the whole thing looked a bit shabby. I had done martial arts for eight years before I damaged my knee in a bicycle accident. My martials arts is slowed up some since then. This place didn't have any real physical workouts despite what I was told.

To be fair I did come back a second time with my kid so that he could see what they were all about. My kid is 9 years old and kids are pretty smart given the chance. He wasn't impressed either.

I'd skip this place if your looking for a martial arts school.

PROS: lots of kids, some variety, a few adults
CONS: few adults, not much martial art, no work out

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

.

This place is very neat. They give one on one lessons. Your able to advance very fast. The staff are patient and kind. There is plenty of parking. They have a clean gym.

5
★★★★★

This place is very neat. They give one on one lessons. Your able to advance very fast. The staff are patient and kind. There is plenty of parking. They have a clean gym.

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