Humane Society Of Huron Valley

★★★☆☆
42.3071 -83.6554
Map and Directions to Humane Society Of Huron Valley

734-662-5585

3100 Cherry Hill Rd

Ann Arbor, MI

48105

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Pets & Animals

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My boyfriend and I went to the humane society in Westland about two months ago just to look since we had been thinking about getting a dog. We absolutely fell in love with a dog there but were heartbroken to find out that we couldn??t quite afford it (recent car problems and other costs have put a damper on our spending). We decided to save until we had enough for a dog, two months or so worth of food, and a vet visit.
So we??ve saved up enough money and today we started our search for the dog of our dreams. We started in Westland because it opened earlier. We played with a couple dogs but we just weren??t in love and we didn??t want to buy one just to buy one, we wanted the PERFECT one. So we headed to Huron Valley; I was very impressed when I walked in, everything was nice and new?it looked amazing, I had a good feeling. We looked around at the dogs and found three that we really liked and wanted to play with.
When I talked to the lady at the desk I mentioned that we came from the Westland facility, she told us that she worked there before and started saying how gross it was over there (which I disagree with) and basically made it seem like Huron Valley was much higher class. Then she asked me (after filling out the survey) if I was 21 years old; I??m not, nor is my boyfriend. We are 19 year old college students and we live with my mother. The lady at the desk told me it wasn??t a big deal as long as my mom approved the adoption and sent us on our way to play with the dogs.
We played with one and completely fell in love? until we tried to go through with the adoption and the women at the next said that my mom would have to come in before six to actually do the adoption. My mom works in Southfield and there is no way she would make it. My heart sunk. The women said she would ask her manager if there was anything she could do. The manager (Jerry?) basically yelled at me and told me that my life will change drastically in the next few years, that it??s a serious commitment to have a pet; one that we??re not ready for, and that it would end up being my mom??s dog because our priorities would change. I was very upset by her comment. Me and my boyfriend attend a community college 25 minutes away from my house, we will go to Eastern Michigan in a year or two and do don??t plan to move on our own until we have stable jobs after college. The longest the dog would be alone is roughly four hours at a time. I was angry that she made assumptions about us because we??re young. I understand having some concern but she was unnecessarily rude. We will never adopt from them. We wanted to give an abandoned animal a home and now (because of this experience) we are questioning if we even want to go through the humane society at all.

1
★☆☆☆☆

My boyfriend and I went to the humane society in Westland about two months ago just to look since we had been thinking about getting a dog. We absolutely fell in love with a dog there but were heartbroken to find out that we couldn??t quite afford it (recent car problems and other costs have put a damper on our spending). We decided to save until we had enough for a dog, two months or so worth of food, and a vet visit.
So we??ve saved up enough money and today we started our search for the dog of our dreams. We started in Westland because it opened earlier. We played with a couple dogs but we just weren??t in love and we didn??t want to buy one just to buy one, we wanted the PERFECT one. So we headed to Huron Valley; I was very impressed when I walked in, everything was nice and new?it looked amazing, I had a good feeling. We looked around at the dogs and found three that we really liked and wanted to play with.
When I talked to the lady at the desk I mentioned that we came from the Westland facility, she told us that she worked there before and started saying how gross it was over there (which I disagree with) and basically made it seem like Huron Valley was much higher class. Then she asked me (after filling out the survey) if I was 21 years old; I??m not, nor is my boyfriend. We are 19 year old college students and we live with my mother. The lady at the desk told me it wasn??t a big deal as long as my mom approved the adoption and sent us on our way to play with the dogs.
We played with one and completely fell in love? until we tried to go through with the adoption and the women at the next said that my mom would have to come in before six to actually do the adoption. My mom works in Southfield and there is no way she would make it. My heart sunk. The women said she would ask her manager if there was anything she could do. The manager (Jerry?) basically yelled at me and told me that my life will change drastically in the next few years, that it??s a serious commitment to have a pet; one that we??re not ready for, and that it would end up being my mom??s dog because our priorities would change. I was very upset by her comment. Me and my boyfriend attend a community college 25 minutes away from my house, we will go to Eastern Michigan in a year or two and do don??t plan to move on our own until we have stable jobs after college. The longest the dog would be alone is roughly four hours at a time. I was angry that she made assumptions about us because we??re young. I understand having some concern but she was unnecessarily rude. We will never adopt from them. We wanted to give an abandoned animal a home and now (because of this experience) we are questioning if we even want to go through the humane society at all.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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This morning, I dropped my male longhair kitten off at HSHV to get him neutered. The office was clean and orderly, but extremely busy (which I didn't actually expect at 8 o'clock on a Tuesday morning). It makes sense, though, when you realize that they do all their surgery intake at the same time. You bring your animal into the office only after you've finished your paper work, so this limits the number of animals in the desk area at any given time (a very good idea, in my mind).

I made the appointment by phone, and the woman who helped me was kind and courteous. She informed me about how my kitten was to fast from midnight until the procedure. I asked her if there was anything more I needed to do or to bring. She said no, it was all set--just bring him in.

I'm glad I had the presence of mind to grab my kitten's medical records on the way out the door, because if you cannot prove your animal has had his shots they will be given to him automatically and you will be charged for them.

I wish HSHV would be more up front about this when people are making appointments. A simple "please bring a copy of your animal's shot record" would suffice. I was not told, and apparently many other people were not told. I was lucky to have remembered to bring his records, but they had to pay for shots their animals had already had. The feline rabies vaccine, especially, has been associated with injection site sarcomas. Injecting the animal more often than is necessary is not advisable.

I understand that people in the past might have tried to lie to HSHV about their animal's shot record, but does that justify re-vaccinating every animal whose owner did not bring his shot record with her because she was not told to do so?

I also understand that the Humane Society is dedicated to animal welfare, and ensuring proper vaccination is an important part of that. However, I think it should be explicitly stated that you must bring proof of vaccination to your surgical appointment. My cynical side wants to think that automatic injections are a wonderful way to make extra money, even though in many cases they are not necessary. Two people in line in front of me were surprised that their animal was going to get their vaccinations again. One woman insisted she could provide proof, but that she would have to go home to get the records. The clerk told her she had 20 minutes to do so, which was not enough time for the lady to go home and back. That was a real shame. The dog will get her shots again (and her owner will have to pay an additional $60) because she lived across town. This whole situation could have been remedied with a simple reminder to bring the dog's shot records to the appointment!

As for cost, the HSHV charges about 1/5th the cost of what my regular vet would have charged for feline neuter. The neuter was $75, but I chose to get pre-op blood work done ($55) for added safety. In the Ann Arbor area, this is the best price you will find for what I hope to be excellent value for the money.

But there are tons of terms and conditions that you must agree to in order to take advantage of HSHV's low-cost neuter/spay rates. I'm going to list some of the more potentially objectionable ones here:

-Your animal will be tattooed. This will be done with your implied permission (since you signed the admission form). This is something to think about, since some animals are hairless and in those cases the tattoo will remain visible for the lifetime of the animal.

-Your animal will be treated for certain conditions discovered during the course of the pre-surgical exam (ear mites, fleas, etc.) You will be charged accordingly. This will be done with your implied permission, and you will not be consulted before the treatment is given.

-Your animal will have any remaining baby teeth or diseased teeth surgically extracted with your implied permission.

Those are some pretty big terms. Again, I think it would be wonderful if these conditions were stated verbally (though they are clearly written in the admissions form) because you got up at 6am, you??re nervous for your animal, and fine print can easily get skimmed over or missed entirely.

I think it would be better for the HSHV to be more forthcoming about these conditions when the pet owner is making the appointment so they can plan accordingly. Also, information regarding these policies should be easily accessible on their website.

That said, the Humane Society is a very respectable charitable organization, and I fully expect my cat to have had a good experience with them.

I will continue my review later today when my kitten and I go through the discharge procedure. I hope I??ve been helpful to you.

3
★★★☆☆

This morning, I dropped my male longhair kitten off at HSHV to get him neutered. The office was clean and orderly, but extremely busy (which I didn't actually expect at 8 o'clock on a Tuesday morning). It makes sense, though, when you realize that they do all their surgery intake at the same time. You bring your animal into the office only after you've finished your paper work, so this limits the number of animals in the desk area at any given time (a very good idea, in my mind).

I made the appointment by phone, and the woman who helped me was kind and courteous. She informed me about how my kitten was to fast from midnight until the procedure. I asked her if there was anything more I needed to do or to bring. She said no, it was all set--just bring him in.

I'm glad I had the presence of mind to grab my kitten's medical records on the way out the door, because if you cannot prove your animal has had his shots they will be given to him automatically and you will be charged for them.

I wish HSHV would be more up front about this when people are making appointments. A simple "please bring a copy of your animal's shot record" would suffice. I was not told, and apparently many other people were not told. I was lucky to have remembered to bring his records, but they had to pay for shots their animals had already had. The feline rabies vaccine, especially, has been associated with injection site sarcomas. Injecting the animal more often than is necessary is not advisable.

I understand that people in the past might have tried to lie to HSHV about their animal's shot record, but does that justify re-vaccinating every animal whose owner did not bring his shot record with her because she was not told to do so?

I also understand that the Humane Society is dedicated to animal welfare, and ensuring proper vaccination is an important part of that. However, I think it should be explicitly stated that you must bring proof of vaccination to your surgical appointment. My cynical side wants to think that automatic injections are a wonderful way to make extra money, even though in many cases they are not necessary. Two people in line in front of me were surprised that their animal was going to get their vaccinations again. One woman insisted she could provide proof, but that she would have to go home to get the records. The clerk told her she had 20 minutes to do so, which was not enough time for the lady to go home and back. That was a real shame. The dog will get her shots again (and her owner will have to pay an additional $60) because she lived across town. This whole situation could have been remedied with a simple reminder to bring the dog's shot records to the appointment!

As for cost, the HSHV charges about 1/5th the cost of what my regular vet would have charged for feline neuter. The neuter was $75, but I chose to get pre-op blood work done ($55) for added safety. In the Ann Arbor area, this is the best price you will find for what I hope to be excellent value for the money.

But there are tons of terms and conditions that you must agree to in order to take advantage of HSHV's low-cost neuter/spay rates. I'm going to list some of the more potentially objectionable ones here:

-Your animal will be tattooed. This will be done with your implied permission (since you signed the admission form). This is something to think about, since some animals are hairless and in those cases the tattoo will remain visible for the lifetime of the animal.

-Your animal will be treated for certain conditions discovered during the course of the pre-surgical exam (ear mites, fleas, etc.) You will be charged accordingly. This will be done with your implied permission, and you will not be consulted before the treatment is given.

-Your animal will have any remaining baby teeth or diseased teeth surgically extracted with your implied permission.

Those are some pretty big terms. Again, I think it would be wonderful if these conditions were stated verbally (though they are clearly written in the admissions form) because you got up at 6am, you??re nervous for your animal, and fine print can easily get skimmed over or missed entirely.

I think it would be better for the HSHV to be more forthcoming about these conditions when the pet owner is making the appointment so they can plan accordingly. Also, information regarding these policies should be easily accessible on their website.

That said, the Humane Society is a very respectable charitable organization, and I fully expect my cat to have had a good experience with them.

I will continue my review later today when my kitten and I go through the discharge procedure. I hope I??ve been helpful to you.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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Today we picked out a cat and my daughter palyed for over and hour with it, then they took it from her and we went to fillout ppw. They decided we could not have the cat based on it would have lots of kitty energy? It should be with other kittens? it was 5 months old? my 6 year old that named the cat and was so happy was heart broken crying and they said "it might be to shy and not be a good compainion" WTF? again they bonded and there was not an issue it was adorable how they played...The staff lied to my 6 year old and crushed her heart she would have LOVED this cat as if it were her baby. We have always been sponsers and paid $$ to these liars and no more!

1
★☆☆☆☆

Today we picked out a cat and my daughter palyed for over and hour with it, then they took it from her and we went to fillout ppw. They decided we could not have the cat based on it would have lots of kitty energy? It should be with other kittens? it was 5 months old? my 6 year old that named the cat and was so happy was heart broken crying and they said "it might be to shy and not be a good compainion" WTF? again they bonded and there was not an issue it was adorable how they played...The staff lied to my 6 year old and crushed her heart she would have LOVED this cat as if it were her baby. We have always been sponsers and paid $$ to these liars and no more!

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2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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I completely agree with Sam J. on this one. My fianc and I wanted to adopt a dog, we found an amazing dog that we felt made a great bond with. We went in for the past three days trying our best to adopt this dog. They eventually lied to us, they said some of the guys my fianc lived with had been in to try and adopt the dog, so there were too many "complications". None of his roommates had gone in, only we had. It's absolutely ridiculous that they not only lied to our faces, but are denying two people the chance to adopt a dog. I grew up around dogs, I know a lot more than others when it comes to breeds and temperaments of certain breeds. It's absolutely ridiculous, they obviously don't realize letting a couple adopt a dog is better than keeping it in a kennel.
I won't even begin to describe the personalities we had to work with. We were trying to be as polite as possible, but it's difficult doing that when someone judges you without knowing you.

1
★☆☆☆☆

I completely agree with Sam J. on this one. My fianc and I wanted to adopt a dog, we found an amazing dog that we felt made a great bond with. We went in for the past three days trying our best to adopt this dog. They eventually lied to us, they said some of the guys my fianc lived with had been in to try and adopt the dog, so there were too many "complications". None of his roommates had gone in, only we had. It's absolutely ridiculous that they not only lied to our faces, but are denying two people the chance to adopt a dog. I grew up around dogs, I know a lot more than others when it comes to breeds and temperaments of certain breeds. It's absolutely ridiculous, they obviously don't realize letting a couple adopt a dog is better than keeping it in a kennel.
I won't even begin to describe the personalities we had to work with. We were trying to be as polite as possible, but it's difficult doing that when someone judges you without knowing you.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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The Humane Society of Huron Valley is discrimination at its best. You jump through more hoops to adopt an animal here than you do to adopt or foster an actual HUMAN BEING. Unless you're one of the (few) privileged people to own a home, you're pretty much out of luck, especially if you're trying to adopt a dog that is stereotyped. They totally negate key points in adoption, such as if the family is loving and serious about adoption, and focus on social factors that put people who may rent or live in anything except a house at the short end of the stick (and this is before they even consider their references, you never even get that far because you don't live in a house? automatic denial). Despite the fact that we could provide a loving home for a dog, we were denied because of this. Not only that, but they wanted to require a home check? What, exactly, could you possible be looking for in the privacy of my own home to determine whether or not I'm "eligible" to adopt a dog? Are people who go to shelters dumb enough to allow a home check and then leave "questionable" things out? My guess is simple things such as maybe an old stain on a carpet would give them enough reasoning to deny an application (because honestly I don't know what you would be looking for in the first place).
Not only that, but they're unwilling to listen and they're unwilling to work with people. They're beyond rude, going as far as to flat out insult people.
If you want to adopt, go through a private rescue group that is willing to listen and work with people based on their unique, individual needs. The humane society claims to want to save animals lives yet they find it acceptable to allow a dog to be confined to a cage all day instead of adopting it out to loving, caring home; using every little excuse to deny people adoptions, based on absurd, ridiculous and far-fetched situations that will never arise.

1
★☆☆☆☆

The Humane Society of Huron Valley is discrimination at its best. You jump through more hoops to adopt an animal here than you do to adopt or foster an actual HUMAN BEING. Unless you're one of the (few) privileged people to own a home, you're pretty much out of luck, especially if you're trying to adopt a dog that is stereotyped. They totally negate key points in adoption, such as if the family is loving and serious about adoption, and focus on social factors that put people who may rent or live in anything except a house at the short end of the stick (and this is before they even consider their references, you never even get that far because you don't live in a house? automatic denial). Despite the fact that we could provide a loving home for a dog, we were denied because of this. Not only that, but they wanted to require a home check? What, exactly, could you possible be looking for in the privacy of my own home to determine whether or not I'm "eligible" to adopt a dog? Are people who go to shelters dumb enough to allow a home check and then leave "questionable" things out? My guess is simple things such as maybe an old stain on a carpet would give them enough reasoning to deny an application (because honestly I don't know what you would be looking for in the first place).
Not only that, but they're unwilling to listen and they're unwilling to work with people. They're beyond rude, going as far as to flat out insult people.
If you want to adopt, go through a private rescue group that is willing to listen and work with people based on their unique, individual needs. The humane society claims to want to save animals lives yet they find it acceptable to allow a dog to be confined to a cage all day instead of adopting it out to loving, caring home; using every little excuse to deny people adoptions, based on absurd, ridiculous and far-fetched situations that will never arise.

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2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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I took my Yorkie for her spay yesterday, as well as to be micro-chipped and have a few double teeth pulled. We went to the Humane Society because it was $200 instead of the $450 my vet was going to charge me. While I saved money, my dog paid for it and I am so angry with myself for putting her through this.

The drop off in the morning was crowded, loud, and felt exactly like a crowded, understaffed free health clinic. (I do a lot of consulting work with urban schools in high poverty areas, so I understand that free health clinics are important community resources.) However, it was a stressful start to the process for my dog. Then, the office staff couldn't find the paperwork for my dog's blood panel that I had my vet fax over to them a month ago. Mind you 3 weeks ago I confirmed with them they had received the paperwork: yes, they had. Then, the day before the surgery I thought I'd just double-check. Seems the paperwork was nowhere to be found. Hmm. Okay, so I had my vet fax it over again, and confirmed with my vet that it had been sent over. But then when I showed up yesterday for the surgery, the Humane Society staff couldn't find it. What the heck??! I wouldn't let my dog have the surgery without the facility doctors seeing her blood work so the office staff kept looking and finally it turned up in... wait for it... my dog's file from her consult visit! They didn't think to look there before. (sigh) It was a stressful start to the day, but I trusted the doctors there, so I left my dog for the spay.

However, I received not one, but TWO phone calls a few hours later to confirm that I wanted my dog's double teeth pulled and for her to be micro-chipped. Um, yes, that's what is marked on her form. Did they lose the form??

And then when I picked her up in the afternoon, it was a madhouse. Crowded waiting room and the receptionist rattling off aftercare directions to everyone en masse like a flight attendant. No Q &A afterwards, they just started bringing pets out and handing them to owners. I did ask the receptionist a few questions, and she answered them.

But what I didn't notice was that my dog had a HUGE black mark on her tummy. I thought maybe it was just a Sharpie marker dot indicating incision area, but it's to the right of the incision and it's HUGE. My dog is 2 1/2 lbs. fully grown and this mark is not only huge, but is also in the area of her belly where she doesn't grow fur. I phoned the humane society to find out what it was and it turns out they TATTOOED her! The receptionist told me it was in the consent I signed and they do it so if she's picked up and take to the humane society, they'll know she's already spayed. Essentially, for their possible future convenience, they disfigured my dog. The same dog they micro-chipped so the micro-chip already had the spay info on it. Well, it was my grave mistake not reading through the teeny tiny fine print at the bottom of the form. I'll admit to that mistake, but I also let them know that TATTOOING someone's dog is a big freakin' deal and that it should be discussed with the owner, not simply done to the dog. Especially since I came in for a consult visit prior to the surgery and asked a plethora of questions to get details about the operation, and at no point did the doctor tell me my dog would be tattooed.

So for the rest of my dog's life she'll look like a five year old has gone at her with a black marker. I'm very angry they just do this without making it clear to pet owners.

The whole experience at the humane society was a negative one and I regret very deeply that I tried to save $250 and my dog paid for it. I would advise anyone considering having his/her dog spayed at the Humane Society of Huron Valley to go elsewhere. Not just because of the tattoo, but because of the overall poor quality of the experience. Your fur baby will thank you for going someplace else!

1
★☆☆☆☆

I took my Yorkie for her spay yesterday, as well as to be micro-chipped and have a few double teeth pulled. We went to the Humane Society because it was $200 instead of the $450 my vet was going to charge me. While I saved money, my dog paid for it and I am so angry with myself for putting her through this.

The drop off in the morning was crowded, loud, and felt exactly like a crowded, understaffed free health clinic. (I do a lot of consulting work with urban schools in high poverty areas, so I understand that free health clinics are important community resources.) However, it was a stressful start to the process for my dog. Then, the office staff couldn't find the paperwork for my dog's blood panel that I had my vet fax over to them a month ago. Mind you 3 weeks ago I confirmed with them they had received the paperwork: yes, they had. Then, the day before the surgery I thought I'd just double-check. Seems the paperwork was nowhere to be found. Hmm. Okay, so I had my vet fax it over again, and confirmed with my vet that it had been sent over. But then when I showed up yesterday for the surgery, the Humane Society staff couldn't find it. What the heck??! I wouldn't let my dog have the surgery without the facility doctors seeing her blood work so the office staff kept looking and finally it turned up in... wait for it... my dog's file from her consult visit! They didn't think to look there before. (sigh) It was a stressful start to the day, but I trusted the doctors there, so I left my dog for the spay.

However, I received not one, but TWO phone calls a few hours later to confirm that I wanted my dog's double teeth pulled and for her to be micro-chipped. Um, yes, that's what is marked on her form. Did they lose the form??

And then when I picked her up in the afternoon, it was a madhouse. Crowded waiting room and the receptionist rattling off aftercare directions to everyone en masse like a flight attendant. No Q &A afterwards, they just started bringing pets out and handing them to owners. I did ask the receptionist a few questions, and she answered them.

But what I didn't notice was that my dog had a HUGE black mark on her tummy. I thought maybe it was just a Sharpie marker dot indicating incision area, but it's to the right of the incision and it's HUGE. My dog is 2 1/2 lbs. fully grown and this mark is not only huge, but is also in the area of her belly where she doesn't grow fur. I phoned the humane society to find out what it was and it turns out they TATTOOED her! The receptionist told me it was in the consent I signed and they do it so if she's picked up and take to the humane society, they'll know she's already spayed. Essentially, for their possible future convenience, they disfigured my dog. The same dog they micro-chipped so the micro-chip already had the spay info on it. Well, it was my grave mistake not reading through the teeny tiny fine print at the bottom of the form. I'll admit to that mistake, but I also let them know that TATTOOING someone's dog is a big freakin' deal and that it should be discussed with the owner, not simply done to the dog. Especially since I came in for a consult visit prior to the surgery and asked a plethora of questions to get details about the operation, and at no point did the doctor tell me my dog would be tattooed.

So for the rest of my dog's life she'll look like a five year old has gone at her with a black marker. I'm very angry they just do this without making it clear to pet owners.

The whole experience at the humane society was a negative one and I regret very deeply that I tried to save $250 and my dog paid for it. I would advise anyone considering having his/her dog spayed at the Humane Society of Huron Valley to go elsewhere. Not just because of the tattoo, but because of the overall poor quality of the experience. Your fur baby will thank you for going someplace else!

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I can't speak for how long they hold animals, but HSHV has a *gorgeous* new facility now that is clean and seems very well-run after several visits. I don't know how long they're currently holding dogs, but I would imagine it's a fairly long time; I was interested in a stray, and he will not be adoptable until he's been there five days. Most shelters are overrun and scrambling, and only euthanize when they are forced to do so (i.e. when there is so little space or money available that every kennel is full or they cannot provide for the number of animals coming in.)

The new facility is large and well-designed, and I saw at least 5 empty adult dog kennels and I think three in the puppy room. Adult dogs have doggie doors with access to the outside, which is exceptional in my experience (having visited several shelters and animal control centers across the country.)

Everyone I spoke to on the staff was polite and helpful, including several phone calls I've made to ask questions or check on a dog's status. Maybe they've changed their training of volunteers or gained funding to hire new staff in the past decade--but the three or four times I've visited and met dogs, I've had good experiences.

I don't know their current holding times or even whether they *are* having to kill any animals. I do know that they run adoption specials, where they offer half-price or free adoptions; cats were free today when I came in.

A lot can change in five or ten years, and I highly recommend a visit to the HSHV. I also recommend supporting your local rescue organizations, most of which are operations that save those animals slated to die due to the overpopulation of city shelters.

--CM

4
★★★★☆

I can't speak for how long they hold animals, but HSHV has a *gorgeous* new facility now that is clean and seems very well-run after several visits. I don't know how long they're currently holding dogs, but I would imagine it's a fairly long time; I was interested in a stray, and he will not be adoptable until he's been there five days. Most shelters are overrun and scrambling, and only euthanize when they are forced to do so (i.e. when there is so little space or money available that every kennel is full or they cannot provide for the number of animals coming in.)

The new facility is large and well-designed, and I saw at least 5 empty adult dog kennels and I think three in the puppy room. Adult dogs have doggie doors with access to the outside, which is exceptional in my experience (having visited several shelters and animal control centers across the country.)

Everyone I spoke to on the staff was polite and helpful, including several phone calls I've made to ask questions or check on a dog's status. Maybe they've changed their training of volunteers or gained funding to hire new staff in the past decade--but the three or four times I've visited and met dogs, I've had good experiences.

I don't know their current holding times or even whether they *are* having to kill any animals. I do know that they run adoption specials, where they offer half-price or free adoptions; cats were free today when I came in.

A lot can change in five or ten years, and I highly recommend a visit to the HSHV. I also recommend supporting your local rescue organizations, most of which are operations that save those animals slated to die due to the overpopulation of city shelters.

--CM

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I volunteered at the shelter in 2001 as a dog walker. I found the staff to be very rude, to volunteers and prospective adopters. You could tell these people considered themselves animal people, not people people. The smell of the place was horrendous on most days and this was in the dead of winter...imagine the summer time! But I gave them another chance when my beloved pet passed and it was time to adopt a new one. I went there first thinking things most surely would have changed in the 8 years since I was there last. Nope...still rude, still stinky and when I called back to check on a dog that I was interested in, the girl on the phone was rude and less than helpful. So I adopted my beloved new dog from the Midland Humane Society that uses foster care for their dogs and doesn't utilize the shelter mentality. Best decision of my life! What a different experience! I am all for adopting vs buying from a breeder but if HSHV really want to help their animals they need to make more changes than just a new building...

2
★★☆☆☆

I volunteered at the shelter in 2001 as a dog walker. I found the staff to be very rude, to volunteers and prospective adopters. You could tell these people considered themselves animal people, not people people. The smell of the place was horrendous on most days and this was in the dead of winter...imagine the summer time! But I gave them another chance when my beloved pet passed and it was time to adopt a new one. I went there first thinking things most surely would have changed in the 8 years since I was there last. Nope...still rude, still stinky and when I called back to check on a dog that I was interested in, the girl on the phone was rude and less than helpful. So I adopted my beloved new dog from the Midland Humane Society that uses foster care for their dogs and doesn't utilize the shelter mentality. Best decision of my life! What a different experience! I am all for adopting vs buying from a breeder but if HSHV really want to help their animals they need to make more changes than just a new building...

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What Ed Z. does not understand is how much good HSHV does for the community. It's real easy for him to say that the county should 'kill' unwanted animals - which is what every community surrounding ours does. But is that the right model - NO! Rather than spending tax payer money for the county to house and euthanize animals, why not have a HUMANE organization utilize it's skills and give every animal a chance for adoption? In addition, HSHV is making a huge effort to develop programs to stop the over population of animals in our county - like TNR & low cost S/N clinics. So, why not have the county pay HSHV to better care for the animals in our community instead of building another jail for the less fortunate. GET WITH THE TIMES ED! Maybe you should also visit the shelter once in a while. I have never seen you while I am out walking dogs every week. HSHV is a wonderful place to adopt from and to volunteer for. Come on out and see why HSHV is different than any humane society.

5
★★★★★

What Ed Z. does not understand is how much good HSHV does for the community. It's real easy for him to say that the county should 'kill' unwanted animals - which is what every community surrounding ours does. But is that the right model - NO! Rather than spending tax payer money for the county to house and euthanize animals, why not have a HUMANE organization utilize it's skills and give every animal a chance for adoption? In addition, HSHV is making a huge effort to develop programs to stop the over population of animals in our county - like TNR & low cost S/N clinics. So, why not have the county pay HSHV to better care for the animals in our community instead of building another jail for the less fortunate. GET WITH THE TIMES ED! Maybe you should also visit the shelter once in a while. I have never seen you while I am out walking dogs every week. HSHV is a wonderful place to adopt from and to volunteer for. Come on out and see why HSHV is different than any humane society.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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Michael H -- & others -- paint an erroneous picture of HSHV. When an
organization kills half of the dogs & cats they receive, they cannot
be considered HUMANE. HSHV does nothing differently than any of the
other shelters in the state (which collectively kill 75-80 thousand
companion animals each year). HSHV is taxpayer-funded (by the County)
just like the shelters in the surrounding counties. HSHV's companion
animal adoptions account for no more than 15% of such adoptions done
in the County each year (most are done person-to-person). I have no
quarrel with HSHV employees or volunteers -- only with their Board,
which remains mired in the "animal control" practices of 20 years ago.
Shelters all over the country are moving toward an "animal welfare"
model. I find it disgraceful that HSHV -- located in a community
that considers itself "progressive" -- is not among them.
For a fuller picture of HSHV programs & practices, see
TENonline.org/hshv.html .

1
★☆☆☆☆

Michael H -- & others -- paint an erroneous picture of HSHV. When an
organization kills half of the dogs & cats they receive, they cannot
be considered HUMANE. HSHV does nothing differently than any of the
other shelters in the state (which collectively kill 75-80 thousand
companion animals each year). HSHV is taxpayer-funded (by the County)
just like the shelters in the surrounding counties. HSHV's companion
animal adoptions account for no more than 15% of such adoptions done
in the County each year (most are done person-to-person). I have no
quarrel with HSHV employees or volunteers -- only with their Board,
which remains mired in the "animal control" practices of 20 years ago.
Shelters all over the country are moving toward an "animal welfare"
model. I find it disgraceful that HSHV -- located in a community
that considers itself "progressive" -- is not among them.
For a fuller picture of HSHV programs & practices, see
TENonline.org/hshv.html .

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0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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I agree that the previous "anonymous" poster does NOT know what they are talking about. The buildings are very old and they do the best they can with what they have. Everything they use to care for birds is what gets donated to them. Being a non-profit organization doesn't exactly allow them to go out and buy huge fancy bird cages, but they DO clean the bird cages daily and always give them fresh water and food which is also donated. If that poster had EVER volunteered their before they would know that the policies and practices are always in the better interest of the animals, and they do not euthanize them after a few days. Stray dogs and cats come in and wait 4-7 days for their owners, if they do not show up those animals get temperment tested, sterilized, vaccinated, then put up for adoption. Once an animal is deemed adoptable it will stay up for adoption until it gets adopted. The HSHV is right on track and doing the best they can, so my message to that "anonymous" poster is get the facts before you speak.

5
★★★★★

I agree that the previous "anonymous" poster does NOT know what they are talking about. The buildings are very old and they do the best they can with what they have. Everything they use to care for birds is what gets donated to them. Being a non-profit organization doesn't exactly allow them to go out and buy huge fancy bird cages, but they DO clean the bird cages daily and always give them fresh water and food which is also donated. If that poster had EVER volunteered their before they would know that the policies and practices are always in the better interest of the animals, and they do not euthanize them after a few days. Stray dogs and cats come in and wait 4-7 days for their owners, if they do not show up those animals get temperment tested, sterilized, vaccinated, then put up for adoption. Once an animal is deemed adoptable it will stay up for adoption until it gets adopted. The HSHV is right on track and doing the best they can, so my message to that "anonymous" poster is get the facts before you speak.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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I found it funny that in a previous post they stated that the condition of the animals is deplorable, and that the HSHV euthanizes its animals shortly after arrival. If they truly were a volunteer of the organization they would know that it is NOT the policy of this particular shelter. While the ideal conditions for birds, is probably not as satisfactory as in other facilities, the poster should keep in mind the buildings age, and the organizations desire to build a new shelter. Also the previous poster overlooked the staff, and volunteers' desire to constantly improve upon the care of all its creatures. Because above all else, going to the shelter, and talking to its volunteers and staff, you gain a level a respect for all the hard workers who truly care about all the animals (yes, even birds) well being.

5
★★★★★

I found it funny that in a previous post they stated that the condition of the animals is deplorable, and that the HSHV euthanizes its animals shortly after arrival. If they truly were a volunteer of the organization they would know that it is NOT the policy of this particular shelter. While the ideal conditions for birds, is probably not as satisfactory as in other facilities, the poster should keep in mind the buildings age, and the organizations desire to build a new shelter. Also the previous poster overlooked the staff, and volunteers' desire to constantly improve upon the care of all its creatures. Because above all else, going to the shelter, and talking to its volunteers and staff, you gain a level a respect for all the hard workers who truly care about all the animals (yes, even birds) well being.

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2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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Maybe Ed Z. needs to spend some time at the shelter to better understand how it operates. The service that is provided to the community far outweighes any dispute he may have with it. Just check out their web-site www.hshv.org to get the REAL information. Better yet, take a ride out to the shelter and see for yourself.

5
★★★★★

Maybe Ed Z. needs to spend some time at the shelter to better understand how it operates. The service that is provided to the community far outweighes any dispute he may have with it. Just check out their web-site www.hshv.org to get the REAL information. Better yet, take a ride out to the shelter and see for yourself.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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I have adopted from the Humane Society and have even volunteered there. The care of the animals their is decent (excluding birds), but the policies and practices are not. Any animal surrendered to them, has only a few days before being euthanized. I would recommend people to look for a specific rescue when needed to surrender and animal to prevent this from happening. They are not set up to handle birds there, so I would not even recommend taking them there.

1
★☆☆☆☆

I have adopted from the Humane Society and have even volunteered there. The care of the animals their is decent (excluding birds), but the policies and practices are not. Any animal surrendered to them, has only a few days before being euthanized. I would recommend people to look for a specific rescue when needed to surrender and animal to prevent this from happening. They are not set up to handle birds there, so I would not even recommend taking them there.

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0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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We got both of our cats as under-weight but adorable kittens at the Humane Society of Huron Valley. The staff was great throughout the whole adoption process- including during the required follow-up period. As part of our contract, we had both spayed and neutered at HVHS, and they did everything they could to make it as comfortable as possible for our 3 month old kittens (and us).

5
★★★★★

We got both of our cats as under-weight but adorable kittens at the Humane Society of Huron Valley. The staff was great throughout the whole adoption process- including during the required follow-up period. As part of our contract, we had both spayed and neutered at HVHS, and they did everything they could to make it as comfortable as possible for our 3 month old kittens (and us).

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2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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i found my best friend and the humane society of huron valley. i thought i would take a look at the humane society instead of going to a breeder. i am so glad i did. i did not have to spend alot of money and i got the dog of my dreams.and the people there were great the helped me with every little detail.

5
★★★★★

i found my best friend and the humane society of huron valley. i thought i would take a look at the humane society instead of going to a breeder. i am so glad i did. i did not have to spend alot of money and i got the dog of my dreams.and the people there were great the helped me with every little detail.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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Lovely people who love love love animals. This shelter is one of the most well run and friendly I've ever been to. They make sure that every prospective owner is thouroughly screened before sending the animal home with them as if the pets were their own. I adopted my dog from them orginally and when he went missing a couple weeks ago, it was an outstanding volunteer who made sure he got home to me. They are not part of the Michigan Humane Society netwrok so they don't receive state funds, but their generous donors and fantastic volunteers amke sure that the animals get better treatment than in any MHS shelter I've been in.

PROS: Clean, cheerful, friendly, well organized
CONS: Its in the boondocks

5
★★★★★

Lovely people who love love love animals. This shelter is one of the most well run and friendly I've ever been to. They make sure that every prospective owner is thouroughly screened before sending the animal home with them as if the pets were their own. I adopted my dog from them orginally and when he went missing a couple weeks ago, it was an outstanding volunteer who made sure he got home to me. They are not part of the Michigan Humane Society netwrok so they don't receive state funds, but their generous donors and fantastic volunteers amke sure that the animals get better treatment than in any MHS shelter I've been in.

PROS: Clean, cheerful, friendly, well organized
CONS: Its in the boondocks

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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