Voyageur Outward Bound Base Camp

★★★★☆

About Voyageur Outward Bound Base Camp

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I thought sending my daughter on this trip would be an enjoyable yet challenging experience. She is incredibly strong physically and emotionally and it was not out of the question whether she would be able to handle it or not. This trip was not out of punishment, like a lot of the other kids she encountered. As her mother, I can't even say she's been grounded once in her 20 years. I have to say that I deeply regret spending the amount of money, and moreover, making my daughter experience a living hell. Since the trip, she has been grinding her teeth in her sleep, and has many other mild post traumatic stress issues. She dislikes being left alone and whenever she discusses the trip she gets quite upset about her experiences from Outward Bound. I would highly discourage anyone sending their child on this trip if there is no rationale for sending them through something like this in the first place.

2
★★☆☆☆

I thought sending my daughter on this trip would be an enjoyable yet challenging experience. She is incredibly strong physically and emotionally and it was not out of the question whether she would be able to handle it or not. This trip was not out of punishment, like a lot of the other kids she encountered. As her mother, I can't even say she's been grounded once in her 20 years. I have to say that I deeply regret spending the amount of money, and moreover, making my daughter experience a living hell. Since the trip, she has been grinding her teeth in her sleep, and has many other mild post traumatic stress issues. She dislikes being left alone and whenever she discusses the trip she gets quite upset about her experiences from Outward Bound. I would highly discourage anyone sending their child on this trip if there is no rationale for sending them through something like this in the first place.

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0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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When I was sixteen I went on a 28 day trip! Both my instructors were stuck by lightning! I performed cpr on one of the instructors whom passed away unfortunately! This trip is the most memorable moment in my life and has changed my life for the better! Just wish I could contact the surviving instructor!

5
★★★★★

When I was sixteen I went on a 28 day trip! Both my instructors were stuck by lightning! I performed cpr on one of the instructors whom passed away unfortunately! This trip is the most memorable moment in my life and has changed my life for the better! Just wish I could contact the surviving instructor!

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When I was 14 (minimum age for the program), I went on the 21 day trip. First week was hiking on the Superior Hiking Trail. Just enough time to get used to the intense cadence and schedule and learn some of the basics of fire-building, wood-gathering, camp setup, and leave-no-trace camping. Then two weeks of intense canoeing. We spent two weeks putting on soaked frozen socks every morning, canoeing 10-15 miles a day, and eating dried fruit and dehydrated mac and cheese. Two weeks into the trip, we spent 3 days separated from each other with our sleeping bag, a mosquito net, a tiny bag of trail mix, dried fruit and a small granola bar. The trip was split into 3 stages: Beginning, Middle, and Final Phase. For the Beginning, the two instructors told us what to do and were on our backs the whole time. For the Middle, they told us where to camp and where to go but let us do as we please at the campsite. For the Final Phase, we elected people from the group to be cooks, wood gatherers, navigator, and leader. From then on, we made our own decisions and the instructors only intervened when there was potential for something going really wrong. They canoed at least 100ft away from us and just kind of followed.

As leader for the Final Phase, I learned a lot about myself and my limits. The six other "brigadiers" looked up to me and followed my orders. I learned to find a balance between needs and sanity of the group. We needed to travel 15+ miles one day, but there were strong head winds and high waters so I opted for stopping at 3PM and getting some good sleep. We woke up at 3 in the morning and caught up our lost mileage under the northern lights in the brisk morning air. Needless to say, everyone was much happier.

No matter what the leadership role elected to, you/your kid will learn so much about him/herself.

For his/her sake and well-being, please send your child on any kind of Outward Bound trip. No matter who he/she is, whether a delinquent or a straight A student, social butterfly or closet case, or somewhere in between, it will be one of the most memorable 3 weeks of his/her life. I was somewhere in between, and I was on the trip with delinquents who had stolen cars and done drugs (all were 14-15). They learned from me, I learned from them.

The best decision parents can make for their child is to send him/her on an Outward Bound trip.

5
★★★★★

When I was 14 (minimum age for the program), I went on the 21 day trip. First week was hiking on the Superior Hiking Trail. Just enough time to get used to the intense cadence and schedule and learn some of the basics of fire-building, wood-gathering, camp setup, and leave-no-trace camping. Then two weeks of intense canoeing. We spent two weeks putting on soaked frozen socks every morning, canoeing 10-15 miles a day, and eating dried fruit and dehydrated mac and cheese. Two weeks into the trip, we spent 3 days separated from each other with our sleeping bag, a mosquito net, a tiny bag of trail mix, dried fruit and a small granola bar. The trip was split into 3 stages: Beginning, Middle, and Final Phase. For the Beginning, the two instructors told us what to do and were on our backs the whole time. For the Middle, they told us where to camp and where to go but let us do as we please at the campsite. For the Final Phase, we elected people from the group to be cooks, wood gatherers, navigator, and leader. From then on, we made our own decisions and the instructors only intervened when there was potential for something going really wrong. They canoed at least 100ft away from us and just kind of followed.

As leader for the Final Phase, I learned a lot about myself and my limits. The six other "brigadiers" looked up to me and followed my orders. I learned to find a balance between needs and sanity of the group. We needed to travel 15+ miles one day, but there were strong head winds and high waters so I opted for stopping at 3PM and getting some good sleep. We woke up at 3 in the morning and caught up our lost mileage under the northern lights in the brisk morning air. Needless to say, everyone was much happier.

No matter what the leadership role elected to, you/your kid will learn so much about him/herself.

For his/her sake and well-being, please send your child on any kind of Outward Bound trip. No matter who he/she is, whether a delinquent or a straight A student, social butterfly or closet case, or somewhere in between, it will be one of the most memorable 3 weeks of his/her life. I was somewhere in between, and I was on the trip with delinquents who had stolen cars and done drugs (all were 14-15). They learned from me, I learned from them.

The best decision parents can make for their child is to send him/her on an Outward Bound trip.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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http://www.vobs.com/

When I finished my undergraduate education, I had had enough of "book learning". I had a friend who had gone on an Outward Bound trip and reccomended it. When I saw the course catalog, and its description of the semester long course, I knew it was for me!
I was in the wilderness for 84 days (with a one-week break in between). The first part was dog sledding and cross-country skiing in MN. We also had a week at the "homeplace" in Ely where we built a dogsled. To say that it was awesome can't fully capture the experience! We slept outside in -30 degree weather. We did our overnight solo with a tarp and sleeping bag in the snow. We mushed sled dogs.
After the break, we went hiking in Big Bend National Park, canoeing on th Rio Grande, and hiking in Mexico. Every step was amazing.
This is a great place to learn organizational and leadership skills. As well as to learn to push yourself emotionally and physically. Would I do it again? YES.

5
★★★★★

http://www.vobs.com/

When I finished my undergraduate education, I had had enough of "book learning". I had a friend who had gone on an Outward Bound trip and reccomended it. When I saw the course catalog, and its description of the semester long course, I knew it was for me!
I was in the wilderness for 84 days (with a one-week break in between). The first part was dog sledding and cross-country skiing in MN. We also had a week at the "homeplace" in Ely where we built a dogsled. To say that it was awesome can't fully capture the experience! We slept outside in -30 degree weather. We did our overnight solo with a tarp and sleeping bag in the snow. We mushed sled dogs.
After the break, we went hiking in Big Bend National Park, canoeing on th Rio Grande, and hiking in Mexico. Every step was amazing.
This is a great place to learn organizational and leadership skills. As well as to learn to push yourself emotionally and physically. Would I do it again? YES.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

.

This is a difficult review to write. My son attended the Voyageur Outward bound "trip" awhile back. 28 days in the wilderness. They paddled in teams for 111 miles and I forgot how many miles of portage they did. It was greuling and MEANT to be this way. The point was Choice and Consequence. Good choice = good consequence. Example, if they paddled and completed the chores on time, and made dinner, cleaned up and HUNG their packs from trees (so bears couldn't get them) then they got to go to bed early and be ready for the next day. Bad choice would be if they were arguing about cooking.... so everything was late, the food tasted bad but they still had to do all the other chores...BUT didn't get to sleep until, oh, 2am...and be back up at sunrise to start the day all over.

It was very difficult on the kids (mine was 14) and it was supposed to be. They HAD to learn to get along w/ each other -- just like in the real world

They gained confidence too ---- but were scared.

At the end of their journey they had to do community service, that's always good.

At least one parent MUST attend a 3 day seminar and learn about what the kids did, and how to help them straighten out their lives. Really, I couldn't figure out WHY three days and what they possibly could talk about....but it was worth it... and very interactive.

HOWEVER the following year, an 'instructor' was killed in the wilderness. A freak storm hit, from what I understand, and he was struck by lightening. The kids and other instructor (only 2 instructors for each team) had to row the body to the nearest Ranger station as they carry NO radios or anything.

PROS: choice v consequence
CONS: none

3
★★★☆☆

This is a difficult review to write. My son attended the Voyageur Outward bound "trip" awhile back. 28 days in the wilderness. They paddled in teams for 111 miles and I forgot how many miles of portage they did. It was greuling and MEANT to be this way. The point was Choice and Consequence. Good choice = good consequence. Example, if they paddled and completed the chores on time, and made dinner, cleaned up and HUNG their packs from trees (so bears couldn't get them) then they got to go to bed early and be ready for the next day. Bad choice would be if they were arguing about cooking.... so everything was late, the food tasted bad but they still had to do all the other chores...BUT didn't get to sleep until, oh, 2am...and be back up at sunrise to start the day all over.

It was very difficult on the kids (mine was 14) and it was supposed to be. They HAD to learn to get along w/ each other -- just like in the real world

They gained confidence too ---- but were scared.

At the end of their journey they had to do community service, that's always good.

At least one parent MUST attend a 3 day seminar and learn about what the kids did, and how to help them straighten out their lives. Really, I couldn't figure out WHY three days and what they possibly could talk about....but it was worth it... and very interactive.

HOWEVER the following year, an 'instructor' was killed in the wilderness. A freak storm hit, from what I understand, and he was struck by lightening. The kids and other instructor (only 2 instructors for each team) had to row the body to the nearest Ranger station as they carry NO radios or anything.

PROS: choice v consequence
CONS: none

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