Laurel Schultz, MD

★★★★☆
37.784 -122.414
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415-668-0888

San Francisco, CA

94102

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About Laurel Schultz, MD

Categories
  • Pediatricians

Health & Medical

Health & Medical
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Disclaimer: I have never been a patient of Dr. Schultz's.

However, I did read her article on WebMD, as she is WebMD's breastfeeding expert, and if you would like to breastfeed your children, you should run as fast as you can in the other direction to find a truly breastfeeding-friendly pediatrician.

In the article, she gives blatantly erroneous advice, that if followed by a patient who wants to breastfeed, could lead to sabotaging her ability to nurse her child. For example, she says "I encourage [new mothers] to nurse frequently -- every three to four hours or so -- to build up milk supply," when nursing every 4 hours for a brand-new baby is not frequent, it is the bare minimum needed adequately feed the baby. Her advice would be appropriate for a forumla-feeding parent, but not a breastfeeding mother.

In addition, when asked "Are there mothers who simply can't nurse for physical reasons or because they don't produce enough milk?" she responds, "Yes, and I've actually seen a fair number recently." This is simply not true. While every woman has a right to choose not to breastfeed, 98% of women physically can breastfeed if they desire. I'm afraid that her advice to limit newborns to 10 or 15 minutes of feeding coupled with the recommendation to feed only every 4 hours is what has caused "a fair number" of her patients not to produce enough milk.

When asked, " How can you tell if your baby is getting enough milk?" her sole response is "I judge that by keeping an eye on the baby's weight." This is also misleading. I'm sure you know formula-fed babies who are small/petite or who have had weight gain on the low end of the curve. A better answer here would be to look at weight gain in combination with the baby's diaper output and behavior. Is the baby meeting developmental milestones? Does the baby appear to be alert and content?

She recommends introducing a bottle at 21 days and says "Nipple confusion is actually pretty uncommon." Unfortunately, this is also misleading. While true nipple confusion may be uncommon (where the baby has a hard time changing the way he or she sucks from a bottle to a breast), it does exist, and nipple preference is common (with early and frequent introduction of a bottle, the baby prefers to take the bottle and may refuse the breast).

Finally, she claims "it's usually the parents who give up nursing, not the child, because the bottle can be such a convenience. Once they see how convenient it is, it can be a slippery slope." If you would like to breastfeed, you need the support of your partner and your pediatrician, not a doctor pushing formula as so much more "convenient."

Again, if you are planning on formula-feeding, I'm sure Dr. Schultz is a fine pediatrician. But if you would like to breastfeed, you should most certainly look elsewhere.

1
★☆☆☆☆

Disclaimer: I have never been a patient of Dr. Schultz's.

However, I did read her article on WebMD, as she is WebMD's breastfeeding expert, and if you would like to breastfeed your children, you should run as fast as you can in the other direction to find a truly breastfeeding-friendly pediatrician.

In the article, she gives blatantly erroneous advice, that if followed by a patient who wants to breastfeed, could lead to sabotaging her ability to nurse her child. For example, she says "I encourage [new mothers] to nurse frequently -- every three to four hours or so -- to build up milk supply," when nursing every 4 hours for a brand-new baby is not frequent, it is the bare minimum needed adequately feed the baby. Her advice would be appropriate for a forumla-feeding parent, but not a breastfeeding mother.

In addition, when asked "Are there mothers who simply can't nurse for physical reasons or because they don't produce enough milk?" she responds, "Yes, and I've actually seen a fair number recently." This is simply not true. While every woman has a right to choose not to breastfeed, 98% of women physically can breastfeed if they desire. I'm afraid that her advice to limit newborns to 10 or 15 minutes of feeding coupled with the recommendation to feed only every 4 hours is what has caused "a fair number" of her patients not to produce enough milk.

When asked, " How can you tell if your baby is getting enough milk?" her sole response is "I judge that by keeping an eye on the baby's weight." This is also misleading. I'm sure you know formula-fed babies who are small/petite or who have had weight gain on the low end of the curve. A better answer here would be to look at weight gain in combination with the baby's diaper output and behavior. Is the baby meeting developmental milestones? Does the baby appear to be alert and content?

She recommends introducing a bottle at 21 days and says "Nipple confusion is actually pretty uncommon." Unfortunately, this is also misleading. While true nipple confusion may be uncommon (where the baby has a hard time changing the way he or she sucks from a bottle to a breast), it does exist, and nipple preference is common (with early and frequent introduction of a bottle, the baby prefers to take the bottle and may refuse the breast).

Finally, she claims "it's usually the parents who give up nursing, not the child, because the bottle can be such a convenience. Once they see how convenient it is, it can be a slippery slope." If you would like to breastfeed, you need the support of your partner and your pediatrician, not a doctor pushing formula as so much more "convenient."

Again, if you are planning on formula-feeding, I'm sure Dr. Schultz is a fine pediatrician. But if you would like to breastfeed, you should most certainly look elsewhere.

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Dr. Laurie has been with my girls from birth through teenage years, and the whole family loves her. She is extremely knowledgeable about children's medicine yet retains an essential humanity and connection to the kids. I have been especially impressed with how well she has been able to transition her relationship with my pre-teen 11 year daughter.

PROS: Great with kids, knowledgeable, kind, compassionate, connected
CONS: none, other than in San Francisco versus Oakland

5
★★★★★

Dr. Laurie has been with my girls from birth through teenage years, and the whole family loves her. She is extremely knowledgeable about children's medicine yet retains an essential humanity and connection to the kids. I have been especially impressed with how well she has been able to transition her relationship with my pre-teen 11 year daughter.

PROS: Great with kids, knowledgeable, kind, compassionate, connected
CONS: none, other than in San Francisco versus Oakland

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We absolutely adore our pediatrician Laurel Schultz. She is definitely the parents' advocate and happy to share different medical views.

She is an adoptive mom of two beautiful kids so she's a great choice if you are adopting domestically or internationally.

5
★★★★★

We absolutely adore our pediatrician Laurel Schultz. She is definitely the parents' advocate and happy to share different medical views.

She is an adoptive mom of two beautiful kids so she's a great choice if you are adopting domestically or internationally.

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