Greggory S. Hurlbut, MD

★☆☆☆☆
  • 3201 Pioneers Boulevard Suite 304

    Lincoln, NE 68502

    Map & Directions
  • 402-483-2987

About Greggory S. Hurlbut, MD

Categories
  • Family Practice Doctors

Health & Medical

Health & Medical
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I almost died because of Dr. Hurlbut's incompetence. In the spring of 2006 I noticed that my stamina was diminished. Initially, I believed that my decreased stamina was the result of being overweight and not getting enough exercise, so I started jogging three days a week in August and eating a healthier diet. In August of 2006 I also selected Dr. Hurlbut as my physician. I had office appointments with him monthly from then until December, 2006.

As I continued to exercise and lose a modest amount of weight (20 pounds or less), my stamina also continued to get worse. I related to Dr. Hurlbut my exercise and the decrease in stamina that was occurring despite my exercise. He apparently did not believe I was telling him the truth. By November my stamina was so poor that I could not walk 100 feet without getting winded. I insisted that I should see a specialist to determine what was wrong with me, but Dr. Hurlbut was equally insistent that a specialist was unwarranted and insurance would not cover the cost because there was no reason to see a specialist. So I didn't see a specialist.

Finally, when I visited family in December, I had a family member do an EKG on me. The EKG showed an inverted T-wave on lead III after mild physical exertion. I made an appointment with Dr. Hurlbut for the first day that I was back in Lincoln.

In meeting with Dr. Hurlbut, he had no interest in looking at the EKG results (that I brought with me to the office) and, after much pleading, finally decided that he would do his own EKG. By this time, there was a strong inversion of the T wave while resting. So Dr. Hurlbut referred me to a cardiologist.

The cardiologist ordered an angiogram and the angiogram came back that my heart was in perfect working order. Dr. Hurlbut gave me the, "I told you so. There is nothing wrong with you other than just being out of shape." I insisted that something was very wrong and finally he conceded to refer me to a pulmonologist.

Dr. Hurlbut's office gave me my patient records to pass on to the pulmonologist. I perused them and his official diagnosis after the angiogram was, translated in layman's terms, "fat and out of shape." [His actually wording was obesity and a medical term that meant poor cardiovascular conditioning.] I spent the week between Dr. Hurlbut's reluctant referral to a pulmonologist and my actual appointment with the pulmonologist working as hard as I could at the gym under the belief that Dr. Hurlbut must know what he was talkign about. But I was frustrated that I was unable to keep a fast enough pace at the lowest resistance setting to keep the elliptical trainer operating.

The pulmonologist ordered standard tests for lung function, all of which indicated bilateral pulmonary emboli. At this point the blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries was three times the normal value and the physicians were concerned that this stress on the heart could cause a heart attack. (And as per the recommendation of Dr. Hurlbut, I had been pushing myself to a heart rate of 160 - 170 bpm for an hour each day!)

Dr. Hurlbut was informed that I was hospitalized with pulmonary emboli, but I did not hear from him throughout my five-day stay in the hospital. When I was released from the hospital I was instructed to have my primary care physician monitor my INR level.

I went to a local blood lab to have my INR checked. When I had my INR level I contacted Dr. Hurlbut's office. They told me that he would not consent to setting a dosage for my warfarin or monitor my INR level unless I allowed his office to draw the blood for the INR measurement (and pay significantly more than the INR measurement costs if done at the lab). He refused to even give a dosage to take that day!

At this point, I cut all ties with Dr. Hurlbut. Not only had he not been responsive to my obviously deteriorating health, but he would rather see me try to determine my own dosages than monitor my INR despite the fees he had collected in the preceding months and would have continued to collect had I stayed with him.

Clearly I am very bitter about my experience with Dr. Hurlbut. I hope that his care for others is more competent and caring than it was with me, but I fear for the lives of his patients.

1
★☆☆☆☆

I almost died because of Dr. Hurlbut's incompetence. In the spring of 2006 I noticed that my stamina was diminished. Initially, I believed that my decreased stamina was the result of being overweight and not getting enough exercise, so I started jogging three days a week in August and eating a healthier diet. In August of 2006 I also selected Dr. Hurlbut as my physician. I had office appointments with him monthly from then until December, 2006.

As I continued to exercise and lose a modest amount of weight (20 pounds or less), my stamina also continued to get worse. I related to Dr. Hurlbut my exercise and the decrease in stamina that was occurring despite my exercise. He apparently did not believe I was telling him the truth. By November my stamina was so poor that I could not walk 100 feet without getting winded. I insisted that I should see a specialist to determine what was wrong with me, but Dr. Hurlbut was equally insistent that a specialist was unwarranted and insurance would not cover the cost because there was no reason to see a specialist. So I didn't see a specialist.

Finally, when I visited family in December, I had a family member do an EKG on me. The EKG showed an inverted T-wave on lead III after mild physical exertion. I made an appointment with Dr. Hurlbut for the first day that I was back in Lincoln.

In meeting with Dr. Hurlbut, he had no interest in looking at the EKG results (that I brought with me to the office) and, after much pleading, finally decided that he would do his own EKG. By this time, there was a strong inversion of the T wave while resting. So Dr. Hurlbut referred me to a cardiologist.

The cardiologist ordered an angiogram and the angiogram came back that my heart was in perfect working order. Dr. Hurlbut gave me the, "I told you so. There is nothing wrong with you other than just being out of shape." I insisted that something was very wrong and finally he conceded to refer me to a pulmonologist.

Dr. Hurlbut's office gave me my patient records to pass on to the pulmonologist. I perused them and his official diagnosis after the angiogram was, translated in layman's terms, "fat and out of shape." [His actually wording was obesity and a medical term that meant poor cardiovascular conditioning.] I spent the week between Dr. Hurlbut's reluctant referral to a pulmonologist and my actual appointment with the pulmonologist working as hard as I could at the gym under the belief that Dr. Hurlbut must know what he was talkign about. But I was frustrated that I was unable to keep a fast enough pace at the lowest resistance setting to keep the elliptical trainer operating.

The pulmonologist ordered standard tests for lung function, all of which indicated bilateral pulmonary emboli. At this point the blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries was three times the normal value and the physicians were concerned that this stress on the heart could cause a heart attack. (And as per the recommendation of Dr. Hurlbut, I had been pushing myself to a heart rate of 160 - 170 bpm for an hour each day!)

Dr. Hurlbut was informed that I was hospitalized with pulmonary emboli, but I did not hear from him throughout my five-day stay in the hospital. When I was released from the hospital I was instructed to have my primary care physician monitor my INR level.

I went to a local blood lab to have my INR checked. When I had my INR level I contacted Dr. Hurlbut's office. They told me that he would not consent to setting a dosage for my warfarin or monitor my INR level unless I allowed his office to draw the blood for the INR measurement (and pay significantly more than the INR measurement costs if done at the lab). He refused to even give a dosage to take that day!

At this point, I cut all ties with Dr. Hurlbut. Not only had he not been responsive to my obviously deteriorating health, but he would rather see me try to determine my own dosages than monitor my INR despite the fees he had collected in the preceding months and would have continued to collect had I stayed with him.

Clearly I am very bitter about my experience with Dr. Hurlbut. I hope that his care for others is more competent and caring than it was with me, but I fear for the lives of his patients.

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