James N. Row, DMD

★★★☆☆
  • 1322 North East Orenco Station Parkway Suite 300

    Hillsboro, OR 97124

    Map & Directions
  • 503-640-4262

About James N. Row, DMD

Categories
  • Dentists

Health & Medical

Health & Medical
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Having been told by another dentist that I needed more than one crown done, and being on a fixed income, I decided to go see Dr. Row after seeing his crown special in the paper. I had two crowns done by Dr. Row and am very happy with the result. He took the time to explain everything to me before he did any work and answered all of my questions. His office staff was very friendly and they made me feel comfortable. I will continue to see Dr. Row in the future for my dental work.

5
★★★★★

Having been told by another dentist that I needed more than one crown done, and being on a fixed income, I decided to go see Dr. Row after seeing his crown special in the paper. I had two crowns done by Dr. Row and am very happy with the result. He took the time to explain everything to me before he did any work and answered all of my questions. His office staff was very friendly and they made me feel comfortable. I will continue to see Dr. Row in the future for my dental work.

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Continued from prior review... For example, if I see decay just starting in the enamel, a condition known in dentistry as "incipient decay," my conservative approach is to keep an eye on it since, with good brushing/flossing it may remineralize and not need a filling. However, another doctor may take a different approach and recommend treatment right away. Incipient decay/demineralization around ortho brackets is not uncommon, nor is incipient decay uncommon between teeth. Unfortunately, this critique is the first I have heard about Pia's dissatisfaction. I am not surprised that she is disappointed that she lost the tooth in the end. I am surprised, though, that this is the first time I have heard of her dissatisfaction, and I am surprised that she did not acknowledge that the risks involved were discussed with her by me prior to commencing any treatment, which I do as a matter of routine. But I am sorry that treatment did not succeed as well as we had hoped for over the long term. With respect to the other critiques, first, I don't even know who wrote them since they declined to identify themselves, and cannot confirm that they were even patients of mine. Generally speaking again, most patients are pleasant and responsible; some are not. Some get upset because, after multiple failed appointments, they get charged $50, as agreed to prior to the missed appointments. It's a way of making a point to them, that they evidently don't remember unless it involves an out-of-pocket cost to them, that everyone's time is valuable, and that they need to make their appointments responsibly (we don't charge people for not making appointments due to things like illness or family emergency). Some patients fail to pay attention to their insurance benefits, and although we bend over backwards to explain to them the information forwarded to us by their insurance company, some patients prefer to rely on their own, frankly, misinformed expectations rather than the information we provided them with. Another issue: some patients construe the treatment options and recommendations we provide as an effort to gouge them with unnecessary treatment to line our pockets. Those patients are typically the type that have no interest in preventative/preservation oriented treatment, but subscribe to the "if it doesn't hurt and isn't broken, don't fix it" philosophy. That same patient, however, will not uncommonly complain about losing a tooth due to a fracture down the root, or half the crown breaking off due to a big filling and years of wear-and-tear, which could have been prevented with a crown, electively performed as recommended at a previous apointment. Thankfully, this perspective on dental care is held by a minority of patients. Actually, if you would like to see more about my philosophy of care, please visit my website, DrRow.com. Finally, the Hummer. The critique was erroneous in claiming that I drove the Hummer all over town. In fact, the Hummer was employed as an eyecatching billboard with my website address on it by parking it next to my office on a main thoroughfare with tens of thousands of cars passing by every day! And not only was it economical advertising (less than half the monthly outlay for an actual billboard, like the one used by my colleague on Hwy 26) and smart advertising (Hillsboro is real restrictive on billboards), and effective advertising (a lot of new patients off HummerDoc.com), but we used it for charity fundraising activities as well; and when it's advertising days ended, I had a marketable asset to sell rather than just an expense column on my books. Fortunately, the people who didn't "get it" regarding the Hummer were apparently in the minority too. Thanks for reading my response. James Row DMD

4
★★★★☆

Continued from prior review... For example, if I see decay just starting in the enamel, a condition known in dentistry as "incipient decay," my conservative approach is to keep an eye on it since, with good brushing/flossing it may remineralize and not need a filling. However, another doctor may take a different approach and recommend treatment right away. Incipient decay/demineralization around ortho brackets is not uncommon, nor is incipient decay uncommon between teeth. Unfortunately, this critique is the first I have heard about Pia's dissatisfaction. I am not surprised that she is disappointed that she lost the tooth in the end. I am surprised, though, that this is the first time I have heard of her dissatisfaction, and I am surprised that she did not acknowledge that the risks involved were discussed with her by me prior to commencing any treatment, which I do as a matter of routine. But I am sorry that treatment did not succeed as well as we had hoped for over the long term. With respect to the other critiques, first, I don't even know who wrote them since they declined to identify themselves, and cannot confirm that they were even patients of mine. Generally speaking again, most patients are pleasant and responsible; some are not. Some get upset because, after multiple failed appointments, they get charged $50, as agreed to prior to the missed appointments. It's a way of making a point to them, that they evidently don't remember unless it involves an out-of-pocket cost to them, that everyone's time is valuable, and that they need to make their appointments responsibly (we don't charge people for not making appointments due to things like illness or family emergency). Some patients fail to pay attention to their insurance benefits, and although we bend over backwards to explain to them the information forwarded to us by their insurance company, some patients prefer to rely on their own, frankly, misinformed expectations rather than the information we provided them with. Another issue: some patients construe the treatment options and recommendations we provide as an effort to gouge them with unnecessary treatment to line our pockets. Those patients are typically the type that have no interest in preventative/preservation oriented treatment, but subscribe to the "if it doesn't hurt and isn't broken, don't fix it" philosophy. That same patient, however, will not uncommonly complain about losing a tooth due to a fracture down the root, or half the crown breaking off due to a big filling and years of wear-and-tear, which could have been prevented with a crown, electively performed as recommended at a previous apointment. Thankfully, this perspective on dental care is held by a minority of patients. Actually, if you would like to see more about my philosophy of care, please visit my website, DrRow.com. Finally, the Hummer. The critique was erroneous in claiming that I drove the Hummer all over town. In fact, the Hummer was employed as an eyecatching billboard with my website address on it by parking it next to my office on a main thoroughfare with tens of thousands of cars passing by every day! And not only was it economical advertising (less than half the monthly outlay for an actual billboard, like the one used by my colleague on Hwy 26) and smart advertising (Hillsboro is real restrictive on billboards), and effective advertising (a lot of new patients off HummerDoc.com), but we used it for charity fundraising activities as well; and when it's advertising days ended, I had a marketable asset to sell rather than just an expense column on my books. Fortunately, the people who didn't "get it" regarding the Hummer were apparently in the minority too. Thanks for reading my response. James Row DMD

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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Hi, I am Dr. James Row. I just stumbled across these negative critiques, and would like to respond to them (please note that I rated myself with sufficient stars to maintain the averaged rating - 3 stars - derived from the other reviews, the purpose being to write an informative response rather than to bump up my overall rating). It is disheartening to read these critiques because my staff at the practice in Hillsboro (which I have since sold after 12 great years in the community) and I always bent over backwards to provide both excellent care and thorough information regarding treatment options, insurance, out-of-pocket costs, etc. And, in the case of Pia, no dentist likes a result that falls short of what everyone was shooting for, even if the patient and doctor were both knowingly pushing the envelope in terms of those results. It is also frustrating to read these critiques because my hands are tied by the Federal HIPAA (patient confidentiality) law from responding to such critiques with case specific information. So I will respond by discussing how issues presented in the critiques typically unfold from my end as a practictioner. First, Pia's critique. I rarely recommend root canals on wisdom teeth. Not only are root canal success rates not as high for wisdom teeth as for other teeth, but wisdom teeth also often have restorative issues associated with them; since wisdom teeth are not usually missed, they are usually removed when there is a problem with them. Sometimes, however, it behooves the patient to keep a wisdom tooth. Perhaps it is a fully functional tooth (as opposed to partially erupted, or sitting in a useless/odd position), or the patient is missing other back teeth, so we need something to prevent their bite from collapsing, or just to provide some kind of chewing surface; or maybe the wisdom tooth is playing an important role in a full mouth orthodontic treatment. When I do root canals on back teeth I commonly perform crowns on them to hold them together. Otherwise the tooth, which takes a real beating from chewing, possibly grinding/clenching too, often just breaks apart like a ship on the rocks (fyi a root canal does not make a tooth stronger ... it weakens the tooth; it's function is to remove the infected/inflamed soft tissue inside the tooth, collectively called pulp tissue, that is causing pain, infection, and/or swelling, thus allowing the tooth to remain rather than be removed; so the crown is essential on back teeth to enhance the durability of the tooth after a root canal). When a crown is not placed on a back tooth following a root canal, usually fractures develop in the crown portion of the tooth and, over time, extend down into the root of the tooth; when that happens the tooth is a lost cause and must be removed (or at the very least, on a multi-rooted tooth, a root must be removed, which is not often done anymore). Why would a patient delay in placing a crown on a back tooth following a root canal? Sometimes cost; sometimes "it doesn't hurt anymore, doctor, so lets leave it alone;" or we may not be able to place a crown on the tooth for some time following the root canal because it is undergoing long term/phased treatment such as orthodontic movement with all the attending hardware. When the treatment is completed a year or two down the road, sometimes the tooth has developed other problems, such as fractures, or even decay, that result in the loss of the tooth. Typically, fractures cannot be seen on a two dimensional xray unless they line up perfectly with the xray beam, which they rarely do ... hence the diagnostic value of the 3 dimensional CT scan. Of course, I am not allowed to speak specifically to Pia's case, but it could be that something explained above may have been involved. One comment by Pia that I can address directly. I spoke with the orthodontist whose comment she reported in her critique, and he advised me that he said no such thing, and in fact, reviewed his chart notes while we were on the phone and reported that he had documented no issues regarding the care I provided. With respect to her report of representations made by another dentist regarding my diagnostic performance, I don't know who the other doctor was, what he/she actually saw or reported, and have no access to his/her chart notes. So speaking generally again, the other doctor may, like the orthodontist, not actually have made such comments, or may have been misunderstood ... or within the range of acceptable differences in diagnosis and treatment planning may have come up with different recommendations. Please continue to Part 2.

4
★★★★☆

Hi, I am Dr. James Row. I just stumbled across these negative critiques, and would like to respond to them (please note that I rated myself with sufficient stars to maintain the averaged rating - 3 stars - derived from the other reviews, the purpose being to write an informative response rather than to bump up my overall rating). It is disheartening to read these critiques because my staff at the practice in Hillsboro (which I have since sold after 12 great years in the community) and I always bent over backwards to provide both excellent care and thorough information regarding treatment options, insurance, out-of-pocket costs, etc. And, in the case of Pia, no dentist likes a result that falls short of what everyone was shooting for, even if the patient and doctor were both knowingly pushing the envelope in terms of those results. It is also frustrating to read these critiques because my hands are tied by the Federal HIPAA (patient confidentiality) law from responding to such critiques with case specific information. So I will respond by discussing how issues presented in the critiques typically unfold from my end as a practictioner. First, Pia's critique. I rarely recommend root canals on wisdom teeth. Not only are root canal success rates not as high for wisdom teeth as for other teeth, but wisdom teeth also often have restorative issues associated with them; since wisdom teeth are not usually missed, they are usually removed when there is a problem with them. Sometimes, however, it behooves the patient to keep a wisdom tooth. Perhaps it is a fully functional tooth (as opposed to partially erupted, or sitting in a useless/odd position), or the patient is missing other back teeth, so we need something to prevent their bite from collapsing, or just to provide some kind of chewing surface; or maybe the wisdom tooth is playing an important role in a full mouth orthodontic treatment. When I do root canals on back teeth I commonly perform crowns on them to hold them together. Otherwise the tooth, which takes a real beating from chewing, possibly grinding/clenching too, often just breaks apart like a ship on the rocks (fyi a root canal does not make a tooth stronger ... it weakens the tooth; it's function is to remove the infected/inflamed soft tissue inside the tooth, collectively called pulp tissue, that is causing pain, infection, and/or swelling, thus allowing the tooth to remain rather than be removed; so the crown is essential on back teeth to enhance the durability of the tooth after a root canal). When a crown is not placed on a back tooth following a root canal, usually fractures develop in the crown portion of the tooth and, over time, extend down into the root of the tooth; when that happens the tooth is a lost cause and must be removed (or at the very least, on a multi-rooted tooth, a root must be removed, which is not often done anymore). Why would a patient delay in placing a crown on a back tooth following a root canal? Sometimes cost; sometimes "it doesn't hurt anymore, doctor, so lets leave it alone;" or we may not be able to place a crown on the tooth for some time following the root canal because it is undergoing long term/phased treatment such as orthodontic movement with all the attending hardware. When the treatment is completed a year or two down the road, sometimes the tooth has developed other problems, such as fractures, or even decay, that result in the loss of the tooth. Typically, fractures cannot be seen on a two dimensional xray unless they line up perfectly with the xray beam, which they rarely do ... hence the diagnostic value of the 3 dimensional CT scan. Of course, I am not allowed to speak specifically to Pia's case, but it could be that something explained above may have been involved. One comment by Pia that I can address directly. I spoke with the orthodontist whose comment she reported in her critique, and he advised me that he said no such thing, and in fact, reviewed his chart notes while we were on the phone and reported that he had documented no issues regarding the care I provided. With respect to her report of representations made by another dentist regarding my diagnostic performance, I don't know who the other doctor was, what he/she actually saw or reported, and have no access to his/her chart notes. So speaking generally again, the other doctor may, like the orthodontist, not actually have made such comments, or may have been misunderstood ... or within the range of acceptable differences in diagnosis and treatment planning may have come up with different recommendations. Please continue to Part 2.

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1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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The doctor decided to do root canal to my wisdom tooth instead of removing it. I ended up paying out of pocket cost just by saving my damn wisdom tooth.This gets even better. Later, i got an infection due the root canal surgery. He is not careful when he did the procedures. The procedures damaged the root of my tooth.My ortho did some x-tray and found out that there's some suspicious thing going on around the root canal. Dr. James decided to do another 3D xtray and ended up paying him almost $200 out of pocket cost because he said it will not cover my insurance. He found out that there's a crack on the root of my tooth and ended up pulling the tooth. What a waste of money of my end. Due to improper treatments it cause the patients like me paying so much money. I swicthed dentist again. My current dentist told me that i have cavities that Dr. James Row didn't take care of it...I can't believe this at all!! Also, there's staff does not make a courtesy phone call and when you missed it you ended up paying $55. What a mess!!!

1
★☆☆☆☆

The doctor decided to do root canal to my wisdom tooth instead of removing it. I ended up paying out of pocket cost just by saving my damn wisdom tooth.This gets even better. Later, i got an infection due the root canal surgery. He is not careful when he did the procedures. The procedures damaged the root of my tooth.My ortho did some x-tray and found out that there's some suspicious thing going on around the root canal. Dr. James decided to do another 3D xtray and ended up paying him almost $200 out of pocket cost because he said it will not cover my insurance. He found out that there's a crack on the root of my tooth and ended up pulling the tooth. What a waste of money of my end. Due to improper treatments it cause the patients like me paying so much money. I swicthed dentist again. My current dentist told me that i have cavities that Dr. James Row didn't take care of it...I can't believe this at all!! Also, there's staff does not make a courtesy phone call and when you missed it you ended up paying $55. What a mess!!!

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I agree with the rest of the review comments. I question the recommended work to be done and the front office is very patronizing.

1
★☆☆☆☆

I agree with the rest of the review comments. I question the recommended work to be done and the front office is very patronizing.

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I had not been to the dentist in a while and was hesitant to go back, but the staff at Dr. Row's office made me feel as if I could get back on the horse and didn't make me feel guilty at all. The office is full of the most modern equipment and the most modern tooth care techniques are used.

4
★★★★☆

I had not been to the dentist in a while and was hesitant to go back, but the staff at Dr. Row's office made me feel as if I could get back on the horse and didn't make me feel guilty at all. The office is full of the most modern equipment and the most modern tooth care techniques are used.

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I went to see Dr. Row several years ago and was not impressed. I felt like he was just out to pay for his hummer--and yes, he proudly drives around a hummer with his name on the side. I was not impressed. We have excellent dental coverage and still ended up with a huge bill for what insurance didn't cover, whereas most business comp for most of what insurance doesn't pay. Spending $200 out of pocket for a basic cleaning ensured I would be taking my business elsewhere. From a purely medical standpoint, service was fine.

2
★★☆☆☆

I went to see Dr. Row several years ago and was not impressed. I felt like he was just out to pay for his hummer--and yes, he proudly drives around a hummer with his name on the side. I was not impressed. We have excellent dental coverage and still ended up with a huge bill for what insurance didn't cover, whereas most business comp for most of what insurance doesn't pay. Spending $200 out of pocket for a basic cleaning ensured I would be taking my business elsewhere. From a purely medical standpoint, service was fine.

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I didn't care for this dentist. I felt he was pushing me into procedures I didn't need; when I switched dentists the new one did not recommend the procedure Dr. Row wanted me to do. In addition Dr. Row was very condescending and patronizing, so I do not recommend him.

2
★★☆☆☆

I didn't care for this dentist. I felt he was pushing me into procedures I didn't need; when I switched dentists the new one did not recommend the procedure Dr. Row wanted me to do. In addition Dr. Row was very condescending and patronizing, so I do not recommend him.

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